Category Archives: Street style fashion

42/100_Red Stiletto_Dior to dream!

42/100_Red Stiletto_Dior to dream!

Monaco . . . a town of glitz and glam and screaming hedonism . . . it’s a place that has to be seen to be believed, and while the charming town of Menton (only some 10kms up the road) instantly had me under it’s spell, it’s safe to say Monaco did not.

It may be one of the worlds luxury capitals but it did not captivate me the way Menton, did. I’m a girl who loves a bit of glitz and glam, but the character and charm and beauty of Menton already had me under it’s spell. It’s fair to say that I didn’t have the chance to explore Monaco at length, but for me first impressions are lasting.

Small on size (the world’s second-smallest country the Vatican is smaller) this town is big on attitude. It may be squeezed into just 200 hectares but Monaco is bustling, busy and noisy, (thanks to constant construction and development here)! Of course driving the GP circuit with it’s familiar tunnels and landmarks was a thrill for a rev-head like me, as was the constrant stream of head turing sports cars. Never before have I been somewhere where I have seen such obscene wealth . . . you should see the size of the boats!

Our first stop was the Casino de Monte-Carlo situated on the Place du Casino . . . opulence at it’s best and no shortage of people lining up to get their photos taken with the myriad of Ferraris, Mercedes and other luxury vehicles out front. The red stilettos had their eye on the red Ferrari, but the growing crowds (and near by eagle-eyed security guard) made that a feat near impossible and so we headed for some retail therapy instead . . . Monaco style . . . which translates to window shopping unless you have some very flexible plastic!

The Avenue des Beaux-Arts Monaco is perhaps one of the most exclusive (and expensive!) shopping streets in the world boasting high-fashion French and Italian retailers such as Yves Saint Laurent, Bvlgari, Cartier, Louis Vuitton and Dior to name a few. They don’t like you taking photos of the shops in this exclusive strip, at the best of times I’m told, and so if I was to take a shot of the red stilettos here, it had to be quick and inconspicuous . . . something that is definitely easier said than done!

This Dior window display instanty caught my eye and I knew I had to grab a shot here . . . and so it was a drop (well place) and shoot and dash! Oh the thrill of it all! Certainly gets the adrenalin going! I also had my eye on the beautiful Louis Vuitton window display opposite which also featured red, but by then I had been spotted by their security guard from within who had other ideas . . . oh well perhaps next time!

You know what they say when one Dior closes . . .

You can see all of the red stiletto adventures so far here @ 100 x Red Stilettos: The 2014 Edition

Posted by red stilletto on 2014-08-16 13:50:25

Tagged: , 100 x: The 2014 Edition , 100x:2014 , Image 42/100 , Red , Red Stiletto , Red Stilettos , Red Shoe , Red Shoes , Heel , Heels , High Heel , High Heels , Monaco , Monte Carlo , Dior , Fashion , Exclusive , Designer , Avenue des Beaux-Arts , Avenue des Beaux-Arts, Monaco , Shop Front , Shop WIndow , Dispaly , Flower , Red Flower , Red Flowers

The Many Faces of Fred Maybee by Wayne Eardley

The Many Faces of Fred Maybee by Wayne Eardley

Chapter One.. Nobody’s Home…The Man In The White Clapboard House

About seven years ago, an older man, older than myself at that time, I would have been closer to sixty than fifty headed my way on Water Street below Simcoe. He was riding an old style fixed gear nineteen sixties bicycle with a large black metal grocery delivery basket attached to the front fork and handlebars. The carriage held two layers of empty worn cardboard boxes and it was lined with a piece of old newspaper, the Examiner circa Dec 05, 1990. The man is one of the curious folks for this town of Peterborough, his dress was quite unusual, his thick wide whale brown corduroy pants were held tight at the ankles as they were tucked into his socks. The waist of those trousers were held tight with a thin black gentlemen’s belt and the steel part of the once gold coloured buckle protruded through a hand made hole poked with an improvised awl several spots back from the last factory manufactured hole. Tucked into the pants was a sooty grey sweater with a short zipper at the neck where one could see an undershirt, grey as well from wear and soot. On top of his head lie a rolled up toque possibly made of wool it too was soot darkened like the other clothes. His feet bore a pair of dark black leather shoes worn in places, with tattered laces, I supposed from using the shoes to help stop the bicycle whose brake system was the old type where one pedaled backwards to engage the brake. Like his clothes that were worn and dirty, smelling of soot, his unshaven face carried a weeks worth of grey stubble and his ruddy face also carried a pile of soot he looked a bit like a racoon, a set of piercing blue eyes eyed me up and down. I immediately thought he resembled a collier worker from our Nova Scotia coal mines or a Welsh actor from the old black and white film titled How Green Was My Valley.

As he stopped for the red light I saw my chance to speak with him, an act that often took more courage than I cared to display for this function of photography, however I did know that in the past my success at taking pictures lie in my ability to penetrate the layers of social etiquette and barge head first into a new situation.

This situation was like the others, a challenge of sorts. My first words were of this nature, “Excuse me sir, good day to you would you allow me to take a photograph of you on your bicycle?” He might as well of spat at me cause he looked back at me at his side with disdain, it did not take him long to lash out, “Why do you want to take my picture?” the words were said in an almost mocking tone. I didn’t have a rehearsed answer so I just said what came to mind, “Well, I’m a photographer and I find you to present yourself as a person who would make for an interesting photo.” He looked at me, again with disdain and drove off, up Water Street where he soon disappeared in the bit of evening traffic, weaving steadily in the left hand lane of the darkening one way street, his boney frame protruding at times through the thick sweater giving the impression of a strong individual, quite focused on the task at hand.

A year later while making a bicycle query at the bike shop on Aylmer Street I spotted the coal miner mans metal carriage adorned bicycle amidst the myriad of other bikes for repair in the shop. The shop owner, Dave let out a small sly grin when I asked where the owner of that bike was. I didn’t know he‘d been a customer for years, I should have, as Dave’s shop called Spokes and Pedals was that type of store. Not a fancy place with music playing or oak display cases like some of the modern bicycle repair shops. No Dave’s was, well it was just a plain old bike shop with piles of bikes on the floor and hanging from the rafters, most of whose handlebars and bike pedals had been turned in to maximize space. In the repair area Dave and his wife Susan adeptly analyzed a bikes problem, the repair bike was hung in the old fashion way using rubber bike tubes hooked to the ceiling, a tube for the handlebars, a tube for the seat post another tube to direct the bike out of the way when a paying customer came into the dark crowded shop to be greeted by the nice Bike Lady, or Dave if she was off somewhere.

We’d been shopping there for over fifteen years. Once we discovered the stores generous policy that granted us the ability to trade in the kids old bikes for a discount when they outgrew them. We became regular customers, I suppose we traded in over a half dozen pairs of bikes over the years. Never once did we require a repair, the bikes were always in year old condition and the shopkeepers were keen to take them in on trade which brought the price of their new Raleigh bikes down to a reasonable price point, one we could live with. Most times, Julie and I would purchase bikes for the kids on our own which can be difficult getting the correct size, however we never once had to return a bike. When at times we’d struggle with decisions on which bike to buy, Dave whose ears were always peeled would step into the conversation assisting Susan who gave way to his more aggressive approach to bike selling. In the end we took both their advices and left the shop with new bikes, bright shiny new bikes.

Now and then, I’d require a horn or bell or tube to replace in a flat tire, that’s funny eh, we call it a flat tire when the tube is punctured, and it was always an interesting experience in the bicycle shop, getting free advice on these parts, and the same thing would always happen, Dave would butt in on the conversation, perhaps to speed things along. Susan would go back to tightening handlebars with the multi tool she kept in her pocket, smiling meekly as she parted company and allowing Dave to make the sale. All of the stores accessories were ingeniously displayed on the beams and walls of the dark shop. There was a display of horns and bells, another display of dust covered air pumps, yet another darkened corner of the space behind the corner displayed a variety of fenders. Tire tubes were much more reasonably priced than in other shops, maybe because they did not come in boxes just tied with an elastic band, oh they still had that feeling to them, that feeling of invisible baby powder and that new tube smell, the smell of rubber trees in Borneo.

I have to admit it is more fun to shop in a store that has a more vibrant display of products, but at the same time I’m drawn to the diverse adventure of entering that particular shop. In a way its like an old fashioned honour system whereas you spend your money where your parents shopped, which is actually quite ridiculous as our parents came from other cities, Toronto and Montreal they’d never been in the shop. The correct words escape me at this moment, branded, that’s what modern analysts would call this, branding and that also is ridiculous. Devoted comes close in description, so does satisfied, it will come to me. Loyalty, that’s it. Not the false loyalty that some larger corporations impress upon you, like car manufacturers or audio system component manufacturers who saturate your mind with images of their products and whose salesmen shake your hand and give you cheap pens and call from time to time seeing how things are, no I mean True Loyalty, loyalty gained by old fashioned good service and a pleasing manner with no ties attached to future sales. One time I read that the Catholic church was the first corporation, the model for corporations, I thought long and hard on that one as it had been written by a pro Muslim writer Malise Ruthven after the 9/11 events and well he might be right although one would have to study the history of tithing and the history of payments to determine the validity of the statement neither of which study would interest me at this time.

On March 9, 2009 a Sunday, I was browsing at Alberts Steel and Scrap Yard on Bethune Street, across the street from the rear of the city library. It was a bright warmish early spring day. Actually I ran into two old friends, acquaintances from the Otonabee area, Kathy Forgie and Clifford Ballantine. We stood there in the sun chewing the fat about various literary pursuits, Kathy was the person who had introduced me to E.Annie Proulx’s book The Shipping News set mostly in Newfoundland. Across the narrow road from them the man on the bike from years earlier, the dirty man, began to sort through the cache of goods thrown out at the blue steel bins belonging to Norm Albert. As it was a Sunday there were many objects that did not fit the category of metal. Unfortunately there were numerous other worn household goods tossed by the bins by folk, to lazy to place the items in their own home garbage for fear the city garbage trucks would not take them. Oh, you know the kind of stuff, blinds and shutters and couches and busted vacuums cleaners and treadmills and those cheap mdf board tv stands and tvs, all kinds of tvs and place settings no longer needed and stuff, just piles of stuff. Some of it was steel which was the draw for me as I was collecting parts for bikes, to fix bikes and well parts are expensive to buy so getting free parts is the best, at least the best for me. And here he was, the coal miner man, doing exactly what I was doing, scrounging for stuff. I had to bid a hasty so long to my friends Cliff and Kathy who understood.

I introduced myself, for the second time in life, and this time, the man responded rather cordially, with a toothless grin shining through his soot stained face. He hadn’t changed since my last encounter a few years back, he was actually still wearing the same costume as that day on Water St when he turned my advances for a photograph down. He said, “my name’s Fred Maybee and I live at 342 Downie Street.” Fred began to volunteer a volume of unsolicited historical information on his life, as if in rote. I listened intently, though not fully understanding the meaning of the dates he was summonsing from inside his head and excitedly relaying to me, as if they had to be spoken, as if he could not contain the information any longer, as if he was showing off to some degree his uncanny ability to recall, in perfect detail events from thirty years ago, I think I was at that moment hypnotized by this ability of his, a degree of autism.

He shut up long enough for me to capture his image, twice, using a piece of crap camera phone, the photos were to be a catalyst so to speak, a spark in my photo journey that would eventually lead to an exhibition of some photo work I’d been collecting of other unusual souls whose lives I’d been fortunate to document somewhat with a lens over the previous couple of decades. Here I was, again, collecting people. By the end of our conversation, I knew where Fred lived, how long he had lived there, when his mother and father had died, where his dad had worked, the GE plant, what religion his mother practiced, Roman Catholic, the name of his sibling Caryl an adopted step sister, when Freds birthday was and exactly to the day how old he was 68. My head was bulging with the knowledge, as innate as it was of Freds world. For some reason the stars had aligned themselves and put us together, to be friends for some time, to share a bit of this world, it is an odd sense I have of these matters, matters that I am not totally convinced were not designed elsewhere, by others. Deities, perhaps, spirits, for sure. Not mere coincidence.

The reason I was at the bins on Bethune Street that day adds some significance to the story. To be truthful, I was at the end of my shift at the Youth Emergency Shelter where I was acting caretaker/repairperson for six weekends, part of the sentence I was serving in the community for growing medical marijuana. Many scoff at the term, medical marijuana, although my clients don’t, let me list a few, not their names of course but their malaises. One lady has fybramylagia without gange she would not eat, a male suffers from intense psychological trauma ever since his arm was shredded in a conveyor belt ten years hence, another lady twitches, at times uncontrollably as a result of her Parkinsons, some men, educators, use the sweet herb to combat their penchant for alcohol, their wives quite happy that they have found another interest, another male suffers from back seizures, I could go on, but except for one, all my clients fall into the medical marijuana category. (I had one addict for a client), a young man who required the most potent herb available, he just loved getting high, leaving his mind behind. One night, I dropped off an order, to his home, he was playing a guitar game on a big TV screen, Guitar Hero and I could see how engrossed he was in this endeavour, he was, according to himself quite good at it, he offered to play backup on a Led Zeppelin song, at which he seemed to play along, in tune, making all the gestures the lead guitarist of the band would, and touching some place on his electronic guitar at the same time the chord was being played through the speakers, after the song ended, there was a score shown on the monitor and he noted, ‘I did pretty good, I only missed two chords’. You had to be there. Exactly which category of medicinal need this fellow falls into eludes me, though I have been told that at a very young age he was observed taking a hit on the hookah pipe his parents passed around the music room, circa 1975 or thereabouts.)

Back at Albert’s Bins. To seal my new relationship with Fred, I opened the trunk of the car and handed him the four beer bottles I’d picked up while grooming the grounds at the shelter that morning. He looked at me with great pleasure, ‘you’re giving those to me’ he said, part in question and part in gratitude. A small warm smile crossed his face. I left to return to the shelter for another hour when my self imposed shift would unofficially finish. While one is serving a sentence in the community, they are under the administration of the prison from which their sentence was commuted, in this case the Lindsay Correctional Facility. There was no worry that the prison would actually have the staff to check up on your whereabouts while you were at your assignment. Only once during my shifts did someone actually call to see that I had shown up for work, and that person was a volunteer at a prisoner advocate centre in the province. A convicted prisoner serving their sentence on weekends will find that their sentence actually commences on Friday nights and runs until Monday morning. A lieutenant at the prison in Lindsay actually called our home around 10 PM to see that I was indeed at home as he had signed me in at the prison only two hours earlier. He was very polite and almost apologetic for calling at such a late hour. One could easily loose their privilege of serving the sentence in the community if they were found away from home except for purposes of the community placement, no exceptions were allowed. A degree of self discipline was required and I found it awkward, applying this discipline to my usual routine of browsing in places like the Home Depot, particularly the day I ran into my probation officer, who turned a blind eye to my indiscrete location.

The sentence for growing marijuana was fourty five days incarceration, to be served on weekends at the Lindsay Correctional Centre (which after one solemn weekend was changed to time in the community) and 18 months of probation. I visited my probation officer four times over a period of four months, at which time she stated, ‘you will no longer have to report to me in person, I’ve got more serious situations that require my attention,’ essentially I was put on the probationary honour system for the next year, no one ever called again.

Fred’s photographs taken that day March 8, 2009, at the bins on Bethune Street were of the lowest quality. They were sent to my home computer from the cell phone that took the pictures. This act in itself is a technical challenge for me to have accomplished, one must choose a mode of sending and then use their pudgy fingertips to type in an internet address and find the word send, then hit the word send and hope that the message with the file attachment reaches the intended destination. In this case it worked. On Monday, the 9th of March, I waded into uncharted waters and began the email send outs to a variety of recipients (a hundred plus folk) titled for the most part as Charlie’s People, there would be 17 send outs in all of more than fourty characters culminating in November with a professional looking exhibit at the Dreams of Beans Coffee Shop and Gallery, the exhibit carried the lofty title Dark Hallways and Other Lost Places in my Soul, Candid Reflections on the Fringes of Town, but to me the images are just simply, Charlie’s People.

That first send out with Fred’s image received a few interesting responses. Washboard Hank a musician wrote back with words to the effect, ‘one time I seen Fred driving up Charlotte Street with a TV in his bicycle carrier, I asked him what the score in the ballgame was? It went right over Freds head.’ Another friend, a computer guy named Ken said, ‘don’t let Fred’s impoverished looks deceive you, one time in a bank I was standing in the line, behind him and he was putting up quite a squawk about the fact he now had to pay for cheques. I made an offer to the branch manager that I would cover the cost of his cheques. The manager discreetly took me aside and whispered in my ear, ‘Fred has more money than you and I will ever see.’

I was beginning to get some idea of who Fred was. The house on Downie Street caught my attentions shortly after my meeting Fred and I recall driving by the home and giving it more than the usual cursory glance. I’ve since learned that the house is of historic significance and once a few years back was written up in an Architectural column of the Peterborough Examiner. The home is constructed in a fashion called Stacked Plank, a term I am not familiar with. According to Fred the home was his Uncles a postman on his mother Eleanors side, his last name was Grisdale and I believe Fred dates the house to the 1850s, Fred has actually recited to me the year his Uncle retired from the Post Office and the amount of his pension, there’s that memory of Freds kicking in whenever it can.

That spring and summer, I would have Fred ‘sightings’ as he road his bike about town. One morning I caught him in motion, on the bicycle as it passed the Cheese Shop on Brock Street, a month later I spotted his bike at the brightly decorated gay couples house beside the laneway where the Armouries and PCVS High School end. Across the street a shelter called the Our Space operated in the basement of the old Legion, the upstairs of the big three storey cream coloured stucco walled building housed the local mens shelter, known as the Brock Mission. I went in and followed the noise downstairs, there was Fred, at a large table, spilling soup all over his thick wool sweater, casually chewing the vegetable matter from the spoon, a large mug of tea and some cookies for later sitting on the table beside his arms. He greeted me with a ‘Hello, it’s you, the fellow I spoke with on March the 9th over by Albert’s Bins, behind the library.’ By this time I was well into the email send outs and I was on a daily search for new subjects to document. I’d captured excellent images of Bongo Dave at his bench, and Mel Webb in his wheelchair wrapped in winter clothing at Mel’s Corner Simcoe and George and Perc McCarrell as he pulled the grocery shopping cart decorated with NDP placards that he used for delivering the local free paper as he walked along Murray Street across from the St. Vincent DePaul store.

The series had inadvertently turned into a job, one I enjoyed, planning the photos, taking the images and writing the script, it evolved from somewhere inside of me, it was as if the marijuana charges had created this situation where I may have felt it necessary to ‘justify my existence’ to a wider selection of people, I always say, ‘from bad comes good.’ At an early junction in the Charlie’s People send outs I asked if anyone was displeased receiving the weekly email with photo attachments to just ask to be taken off the list, two asked out of a total of I’m guessing here, a hundred and twenty five, one nice lady, the wife of a cousin just said she didn’t like these types of emails and another a professor at U of T said his slow internet connection got jammed up on bigger files. My mind began to assemble a cast choosing from archival photographs of interesting folk who graced the streets of Peterborough over the past two decades and including the folk whom I’d been observing more recently, showing Fred’s photos to the public certainly was the catalyst for the series. Of all the images, the photos of Fred were the poorest quality, by far, yet they were the roots, the beginning of an interesting photojournalistic journey, that would continue to grow and be fertile long after the photos had been sent. Some of the photos would be seen at City Hall, some in Churches, yet others at public meetings in the local Library, coinciding with the release of the photos were some grim statistics, over the next year five of the characters portrayed in the series would die. For what it’s worth, these photos brought me a degree of acclaim in the community, my intentions to ‘Justify my Existence’ was being achieved.

On the 8th of April I watched as Fred rode his bicycle down Brock Street past the Cheese Shop, he was quite focused and intent on reaching his destination. I quickly snapped three images. Less than a month later we met again, this time on Murray Street near the Murray Street Baptist Church. I got out of my car and pulled him over and spoke with him and asked him if he would pose for photos. We walked over to a grey stone wall of the church where I took several photos. When I got home and put the images into the computer I realized that there was a substance, a chocolate coloured smear around Freds mouth, he had probably just had a meal at one of the local churches, I’m guessing it was the Saturday lunch at St John’s Anglican Church. When I asked where he was heading he pointed towards the old Legion building and muttered, the Warming Room. He had remembered me. A few weeks went by when I spotted his bicycle in the Armoury laneway again. I parked the car and entered the Warming Room where I found Fred sitting at a banquet table, a bowl of soup in front of him and some crusts of bread, he greeted me in his likeable tone, ‘hellooo, I remember you, you’re that guy who takes photographs of people.’ I sat down and conversed for some time while I took in my surroundings.

There would have been twenty or so folk in the room of varying ages raging from sixteen to seventy. The room was large and comfortable with odd bits and pieces of furniture scattered here and there, handmade tapestry quilts adorned the walls, in one corner an office had been set up complete with a phone, desk, a computer and the usual paraphernalia. On the back wall a makeshift kitchen was manned by two or three volunteers who kept busy adding to a big pot of food on a stove. Large coffee urns were set up on a table alongside a tray that held an assortment of cups and spoons. Beside the urns a tray held several types of bread, a lone knife could be seen sticking out of a half filled jar of peanut butter. Groups of folks were separated by the tables they chose to sit at. One group was busy making art, a thin pleasant voiced middle aged woman was instructing them. Some folk played dominoes and their animated voices were louder than the others, in particular the voice of ‘the little guy Primrose’ who sported a Sai Baba style hairdo, his grin extended past the normal parameters. I was curious. An old piano sat in one corner, adjacent to it there was a homemade cloth of yellow that had been signed by a number of folk, I learned that this was the blanket which had belonged to one of the men who had died recently in the creek behind the beer store. A group sat on the couches, some sat alone gazing at nothing. It was midday but it could have been anytime, on any day of any year.

Posted by selrahcyrogerg on 2014-01-15 19:50:42

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Banksy in Boston: Visitors getting photos with the NO LOITRIN piece on Essex St in Central Square, Cambridge

Banksy in Boston: Visitors getting photos with the NO LOITRIN piece on Essex St in Central Square, Cambridge

Interestingly, both of the Boston area Banksy pieces are on Essex St:

F̶O̶L̶L̶O̶W̶ ̶Y̶O̶U̶R̶ ̶D̶R̶E̶A̶M̶S̶ CANCELLED (aka chimney sweep) in Chinatown, Boston
NO LOITRIN in Central Square, Cambridge.

Does that mean anything? It looks like he favors Essex named streets & roads when he can. In 2008, he did another notable Essex work in London, for example, and posters on the Banksy Forums picked up & discussed on the Essex link as well.

Is there an Essex Street in any of the other nearby towns? It looks like there are several: Brookline, Charlestown, Chelsea, Gloucester, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lynn, Medford, Melrose, Quincy, Revere, Salem, Saugus, Somerville, Swampscott, and Waltham. Most of these seem improbable to me, other than maybe Brookline, or maybe Somerville or Charlestown. But they start getting pretty suburban after that.

But, again, why "Essex"? In a comment on this photo, Birbeck helps clarify:

I can only surmise that he’s having a ‘dig’ at Essex UK, especially with the misspelling of ‘Loitering’. Here, the general view of the urban districts in Essex: working class but with right wing views; that they’re not the most intellectual bunch; rather obsessed with fashion (well, their idea of it); their place of worship is the shopping mall; enjoy rowdy nights out; girls are thought of as being dumb, fake blonde hair/tans and promiscuous; and guys are good at the ‘chit chat’, and swagger around showing off their dosh (money).

It was also the region that once had Europe’s largest Ford motor factory. In its heyday, 1 in 3 British cars were made in Dagenham, Essex. Pay was good for such unskilled labour, generations worked mind-numbing routines on assembly lines for 80 years. In 2002 the recession ended the dream.

• • • • •

This photo appeared on Grafitti – A arte das ruas on Yahoo Meme. Yes, Yahoo has a Tumblr/Posterous-esque "Meme" service now — I was as surprised as you are.

• • • • •

Banksy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Banksy
Birth name
Unknown

Born
1974 or 1975 (1974 or 1975), Bristol, UK[1]

Nationality
British

Field
Graffiti
Street Art
Bristol underground scene
Sculpture

Movement
Anti-Totalitarianism
Anti-capitalism
Pacifism
Anti-War
Anarchism
Atheism
Anti-Fascism

Works
Naked Man Image
One Nation Under CCTV
Anarchist Rat
Ozone’s Angel
Pulp Fiction

Banksy is a pseudonymous[2][3][4] British graffiti artist. He is believed to be a native of Yate, South Gloucestershire, near Bristol[2] and to have been born in 1974,[5] but his identity is unknown.[6] According to Tristan Manco[who?], Banksy "was born in 1974 and raised in Bristol, England. The son of a photocopier technician, he trained as a butcher but became involved in graffiti during the great Bristol aerosol boom of the late 1980s."[7] His artworks are often satirical pieces of art on topics such as politics, culture, and ethics. His street art, which combines graffiti writing with a distinctive stencilling technique, is similar to Blek le Rat, who began to work with stencils in 1981 in Paris and members of the anarcho-punk band Crass who maintained a graffiti stencil campaign on the London Tube System in the late 1970s and early 1980s. His art has appeared in cities around the world.[8] Banksy’s work was born out of the Bristol underground scene which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.

Banksy does not sell photos of street graffiti.[9] Art auctioneers have been known to attempt to sell his street art on location and leave the problem of its removal in the hands of the winning bidder.[10]

Banksy’s first film, Exit Through The Gift Shop, billed as "the world’s first street art disaster movie", made its debut at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.[11] The film was released in the UK on March 5.[12]

Contents

1 Career
•• 1.1 2000
•• 1.2 2002
•• 1.3 2003
•• 1.4 2004
•• 1.5 2005
•• 1.6 2006
•• 1.7 2007
•• 1.8 2008
•• 1.9 2009
•• 1.10 2010
2 Notable art pieces
3 Technique
4 Identity
5 Controversy
6 Bibliography
7 References
8 External links

Career

Banksy started as a freehand graffiti artist 1992–1994[14] as one of Bristol’s DryBreadZ Crew (DBZ), with Kato and Tes.[15] He was inspired by local artists and his work was part of the larger Bristol underground scene. From the start he used stencils as elements of his freehand pieces, too.[14] By 2000 he had turned to the art of stencilling after realising how much less time it took to complete a piece. He claims he changed to stencilling whilst he was hiding from the police under a train carriage, when he noticed the stencilled serial number[16] and by employing this technique, he soon became more widely noticed for his art around Bristol and London.[16]

Stencil on the waterline of The Thekla, an entertainment boat in central Bristol – (wider view). The image of Death is based on a 19th century etching illustrating the pestilence of The Great Stink.[17]

Banksy’s stencils feature striking and humorous images occasionally combined with slogans. The message is usually anti-war, anti-capitalist or anti-establishment. Subjects often include rats, monkeys, policemen, soldiers, children, and the elderly.

In late 2001, on a trip to Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, he met up with the Gen-X pastellist, visual activist, and recluse James DeWeaver in Byron Bay[clarification needed], where he stencilled a parachuting rat with a clothes peg on its nose above a toilet at the Arts Factory Lodge. This stencil can no longer be located. He also makes stickers (the Neighbourhood Watch subvert) and sculpture (the murdered phone-box), and was responsible for the cover art of Blur’s 2003 album Think Tank.

2000

The album cover for Monk & Canatella‘s Do Community Service was conceived and illustrated by Banksy, based on his contribution to the "Walls on fire" event in Bristol 1998.[18][citation needed]

2002

On 19 July 2002, Banksy’s first Los Angeles exhibition debuted at 33 1/3 Gallery, a small Silverlake venue owned by Frank Sosa. The exhibition, entitled Existencilism, was curated by 33 1/3 Gallery, Malathion, Funk Lazy Promotions, and B+.[19]

2003

In 2003 in an exhibition called Turf War, held in a warehouse, Banksy painted on animals. Although the RSPCA declared the conditions suitable, an animal rights activist chained herself to the railings in protest.[20] He later moved on to producing subverted paintings; one example is Monet‘s Water Lily Pond, adapted to include urban detritus such as litter and a shopping trolley floating in its reflective waters; another is Edward Hopper‘s Nighthawks, redrawn to show that the characters are looking at a British football hooligan, dressed only in his Union Flag underpants, who has just thrown an object through the glass window of the cafe. These oil paintings were shown at a twelve-day exhibition in Westbourne Grove, London in 2005.[21]

2004

In August 2004, Banksy produced a quantity of spoof British £10 notes substituting the picture of the Queen’s head with Princess Diana‘s head and changing the text "Bank of England" to "Banksy of England." Someone threw a large wad of these into a crowd at Notting Hill Carnival that year, which some recipients then tried to spend in local shops. These notes were also given with invitations to a Santa’s Ghetto exhibition by Pictures on Walls. The individual notes have since been selling on eBay for about £200 each. A wad of the notes were also thrown over a fence and into the crowd near the NME signing tent at The Reading Festival. A limited run of 50 signed posters containing ten uncut notes were also produced and sold by Pictures on Walls for £100 each to commemorate the death of Princess Diana. One of these sold in October 2007 at Bonhams auction house in London for £24,000.

2005

In August 2005, Banksy, on a trip to the Palestinian territories, created nine images on Israel’s highly controversial West Bank barrier. He reportedly said "The Israeli government is building a wall surrounding the occupied Palestinian territories. It stands three times the height of the Berlin Wall and will eventually run for over 700km—the distance from London to Zurich. "[22]

2006

• Banksy held an exhibition called Barely Legal, billed as a "three day vandalised warehouse extravaganza" in Los Angeles, on the weekend of 16 September. The exhibition featured a live "elephant in a room", painted in a pink and gold floral wallpaper pattern.[23]
• After Christina Aguilera bought an original of Queen Victoria as a lesbian and two prints for £25,000,[24] on 19 October 2006 a set of Kate Moss paintings sold in Sotheby’s London for £50,400, setting an auction record for Banksy’s work. The six silk-screen prints, featuring the model painted in the style of Andy Warhol‘s Marilyn Monroe pictures, sold for five times their estimated value. His stencil of a green Mona Lisa with real paint dripping from her eyes sold for £57,600 at the same auction.[25]
• In December, journalist Max Foster coined the phrase, "the Banksy Effect", to illustrate how interest in other street artists was growing on the back of Banksy’s success.[26]

2007

• On 21 February 2007, Sotheby’s auction house in London auctioned three works, reaching the highest ever price for a Banksy work at auction: over £102,000 for his Bombing Middle England. Two of his other graffiti works, Balloon Girl and Bomb Hugger, sold for £37,200 and £31,200 respectively, which were well above their estimated prices.[27] The following day’s auction saw a further three Banksy works reach soaring prices: Ballerina With Action Man Parts reached £96,000; Glory sold for £72,000; Untitled (2004) sold for £33,600; all significantly above estimated values.[28] To coincide with the second day of auctions, Banksy updated his website with a new image of an auction house scene showing people bidding on a picture that said, "I Can’t Believe You Morons Actually Buy This Shit."[6]
• In February 2007, the owners of a house with a Banksy mural on the side in Bristol decided to sell the house through Red Propeller art gallery after offers fell through because the prospective buyers wanted to remove the mural. It is listed as a mural which comes with a house attached.[29]
• In April 2007, Transport for London painted over Banksy’s iconic image of a scene from Quentin Tarantino‘s Pulp Fiction, with Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta clutching bananas instead of guns. Although the image was very popular, Transport for London claimed that the "graffiti" created "a general atmosphere of neglect and social decay which in turn encourages crime" and their staff are "professional cleaners not professional art critics".[30] Banksy tagged the same site again (pictured at right). This time the actors were portrayed as holding real guns instead of bananas, but they were adorned with banana costumes. Banksy made a tribute art piece over this second Pulp Fiction piece. The tribute was for 19-year-old British graffiti artist Ozone, who was hit by an underground train in Barking, East London, along with fellow artist Wants, on 12 January 2007.[31] The piece was of an angel wearing a bullet-proof vest, holding a skull. He also wrote a note on his website, saying:

The last time I hit this spot I painted a crap picture of two men in banana costumes waving hand guns. A few weeks later a writer called Ozone completely dogged it and then wrote ‘If it’s better next time I’ll leave it’ in the bottom corner. When we lost Ozone we lost a fearless graffiti writer and as it turns out a pretty perceptive art critic. Ozone – rest in peace.[citation needed]

Ozone’s Angel

• On 27 April 2007, a new record high for the sale of Banksy’s work was set with the auction of the work Space Girl & Bird fetching £288,000 (US$576,000), around 20 times the estimate at Bonhams of London.[32]
• On 21 May 2007 Banksy gained the award for Art’s Greatest living Briton. Banksy, as expected, did not turn up to collect his award, and continued with his notoriously anonymous status.
• On 4 June 2007, it was reported that Banksy’s The Drinker had been stolen.[33][34]
• In October 2007, most of his works offered for sale at Bonhams auction house in London sold for more than twice their reserve price.[35]

• Banksy has published a "manifesto" on his website.[36] The text of the manifesto is credited as the diary entry of one Lieutenant Colonel Mervin Willett Gonin, DSO, which is exhibited in the Imperial War Museum. It describes how a shipment of lipstick to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp immediately after its liberation at the end of World War II helped the internees regain their humanity. However, as of 18 January 2008, Banksy’s Manifesto has been substituted with Graffiti Heroes #03 that describes Peter Chappell’s graffiti quest of the 1970s that worked to free George Davis of his imprisonment.[37] By 12 August 2009 he was relying on Emo Phillips’ "When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle. Then I realised God doesn’t work that way, so I stole one and prayed for forgiveness."
• A small number of Banksy’s works can be seen in the movie Children of Men, including a stenciled image of two policemen kissing and another stencil of a child looking down a shop.
• In the 2007 film Shoot ‘Em Up starring Clive Owen, Banksy’s tag can be seen on a dumpster in the film’s credits.
• Banksy, who deals mostly with Lazarides Gallery in London, claims that the exhibition at Vanina Holasek Gallery in New York (his first major exhibition in that city) is unauthorised. The exhibition featured 62 of his paintings and prints.[38]

2008

• In March, a stencilled graffiti work appeared on Thames Water tower in the middle of the Holland Park roundabout, and it was widely attributed to Banksy. It was of a child painting the tag "Take this Society" in bright orange. London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham spokesman, Councillor Greg Smith branded the art as vandalism, and ordered its immediate removal, which was carried out by H&F council workmen within three days.[39]
• Over the weekend 3–5 May in London, Banksy hosted an exhibition called The Cans Festival. It was situated on Leake Street, a road tunnel formerly used by Eurostar underneath London Waterloo station. Graffiti artists with stencils were invited to join in and paint their own artwork, as long as it didn’t cover anyone else’s.[40] Artists included Blek le Rat, Broken Crow, C215, Cartrain, Dolk, Dotmasters, J.Glover, Eine, Eelus, Hero, Pure evil, Jef Aérosol, Mr Brainwash, Tom Civil and Roadsworth.[citation needed]
• In late August 2008, marking the third anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the associated levee failure disaster, Banksy produced a series of works in New Orleans, Louisiana, mostly on buildings derelict since the disaster.[41]
• A stencil painting attributed to Banksy appeared at a vacant petrol station in the Ensley neighbourhood of Birmingham, Alabama on 29 August as Hurricane Gustav approached the New Orleans area. The painting depicting a hooded member of the Ku Klux Klan hanging from a noose was quickly covered with black spray paint and later removed altogether.[42]
• His first official exhibition in New York, the "Village Pet Store And Charcoal Grill," opened 5 October 2008. The animatronic pets in the store window include a mother hen watching over her baby Chicken McNuggets as they peck at a barbecue sauce packet, and a rabbit putting makeup on in a mirror.[43]
• The Westminster City Council stated in October 2008 that the work "One Nation Under CCTV", painted in April 2008 will be painted over as it is graffiti. The council says it will remove any graffiti, regardless of the reputation of its creator, and specifically stated that Banksy "has no more right to paint graffiti than a child". Robert Davis, the chairman of the council planning committee told The Times newspaper: "If we condone this then we might as well say that any kid with a spray can is producing art". [44] The work was painted over in April 2009.
• In December 2008, The Little Diver, a Banksy image of a diver in a duffle coat in Melbourne Australia was vandalised. The image was protected by a sheet of clear perspex, however silver paint was poured behind the protective sheet and later tagged with the words "Banksy woz ere". The image was almost completely destroyed.[45].

2009

• May 2009, parts company with agent Steve Lazarides. Announces Pest Control [46] the handling service who act on his behalf will be the only point of sale for new works.
• On 13 June 2009, the Banksy UK Summer show opened at Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery, featuring more than 100 works of art, including animatronics and installations; it is his largest exhibition yet, featuring 78 new works.[47][48] Reaction to the show was positive, with over 8,500 visitors to the show on the first weekend.[49] Over the course of the twelve weeks, the exhibition has been visited over 300,000 times.[50]
• In September 2009, a Banksy work parodying the Royal Family was partially destroyed by Hackney Council after they served an enforcement notice for graffiti removal to the former address of the property owner. The mural had been commissioned for the 2003 Blur single "Crazy Beat" and the property owner, who had allowed the piece to be painted, was reported to have been in tears when she saw it was being painted over.[51]
• In December 2009, Banksy marked the end of the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference by painting four murals on global warming. One included "I don’t believe in global warming" which was submerged in water.[52]

2010

• The world premiere of the film Exit Through the Gift Shop occurred at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, on 24 January. He created 10 street pieces around Park City and Salt Lake City to tie in with the screening.[53]
• In February, The Whitehouse public house in Liverpool, England, is sold for £114,000 at auction.[54] The side of the building has an image of a giant rat by Banksy.[55]
• In April 2010, Melbourne City Council in Australia reported that they had inadvertently ordered private contractors to paint over the last remaining Banksy art in the city. The image was of a rat descending in a parachute adorning the wall of an old council building behind the Forum Theatre. In 2008 Vandals had poured paint over a stencil of an old-fashioned diver wearing a trenchcoat. A council spokeswoman has said they would now rush through retrospective permits to protect other “famous or significant artworks” in the city.[56]
• In April 2010 to coincide with the premier of Exit through the Gift Shop in San Francisco, 5 of his pieces appeared in various parts of the city.[57] Banksy reportedly paid a Chinatown building owner $50 for the use of their wall for one of his stencils.[58]
• In May 2010 to coincide with the release of "Exit Through the Gift Shop" in Chicago, one piece appeared in the city.

Notable art pieces

In addition to his artwork, Banksy has claimed responsibility for a number of high profile art pieces, including the following:

• At London Zoo, he climbed into the penguin enclosure and painted "We’re bored of fish" in seven foot high letters.[59]
• At Bristol Zoo, he left the message ‘I want out. This place is too cold. Keeper smells. Boring, boring, boring.’ in the elephant enclosure.[60]
• In March 2005, he placed subverted artworks in the Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York.[61]
• He put up a subverted painting in London’s Tate Britain gallery.
• In May 2005 Banksy’s version of a primitive cave painting depicting a human figure hunting wildlife whilst pushing a shopping trolley was hung in gallery 49 of the British Museum, London. Upon discovery, they added it to their permanent collection.[62]

Near Bethlehem – 2005

• Banksy has sprayed "This is not a photo opportunity" on certain photograph spots.
• In August 2005, Banksy painted nine images on the Israeli West Bank barrier, including an image of a ladder going up and over the wall and an image of children digging a hole through the wall.[22][63][64][65]

See also: Other Banksy works on the Israeli West Bank barrier

• In April 2006, Banksy created a sculpture based on a crumpled red phone box with a pickaxe in its side, apparently bleeding, and placed it in a street in Soho, London. It was later removed by Westminster Council. BT released a press release, which said: "This is a stunning visual comment on BT’s transformation from an old-fashioned telecommunications company into a modern communications services provider."[66]
• In June 2006, Banksy created an image of a naked man hanging out of a bedroom window on a wall visible from Park Street in central Bristol. The image sparked some controversy, with the Bristol City Council leaving it up to the public to decide whether it should stay or go.[67] After an internet discussion in which 97% (all but 6 people) supported the stencil, the city council decided it would be left on the building.[67] The mural was later defaced with paint.[67]
• In August/September 2006, Banksy replaced up to 500 copies of Paris Hilton‘s debut CD, Paris, in 48 different UK record stores with his own cover art and remixes by Danger Mouse. Music tracks were given titles such as "Why am I Famous?", "What Have I Done?" and "What Am I For?". Several copies of the CD were purchased by the public before stores were able to remove them, some going on to be sold for as much as £750 on online auction websites such as eBay. The cover art depicted Paris Hilton digitally altered to appear topless. Other pictures feature her with a dog’s head replacing her own, and one of her stepping out of a luxury car, edited to include a group of homeless people, which included the caption "90% of success is just showing up".[68][69][70]
• In September 2006, Banksy dressed an inflatable doll in the manner of a Guantanamo Bay detainment camp prisoner (orange jumpsuit, black hood, and handcuffs) and then placed the figure within the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad ride at the Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, California.[71][72]

Technique

Asked about his technique, Banksy said:

“I use whatever it takes. Sometimes that just means drawing a moustache on a girl’s face on some billboard, sometimes that means sweating for days over an intricate drawing. Efficiency is the key.[73]

Stencils are traditionally hand drawn or printed onto sheets of acetate or card, before being cut out by hand. Because of the secretive nature of Banksy’s work and identity, it is uncertain what techniques he uses to generate the images in his stencils, though it is assumed he uses computers for some images due to the photocopy nature of much of his work.

He mentions in his book, Wall and Piece, that as he was starting to do graffiti, he was always too slow and was either caught or could never finish the art in the one sitting. So he devised a series of intricate stencils to minimise time and overlapping of the colour.

Identity

Banksy’s real name has been widely reported to be Robert or Robin Banks.[74][75][76] His year of birth has been given as 1974.[62]

Simon Hattenstone from Guardian Unlimited is one of the very few people to have interviewed him face-to-face. Hattenstone describes him as "a cross of Jimmy Nail and British rapper Mike Skinner" and "a 28 year old male who showed up wearing jeans and a t-shirt with a silver tooth, silver chain, and one silver earring".[77] In the same interview, Banksy revealed that his parents think their son is a painter and decorator.[77]

In May 2007, an extensive article written by Lauren Collins of the New Yorker re-opened the Banksy-identity controversy citing a 2004 photograph of the artist that was taken in Jamaica during the Two-Culture Clash project and later published in the Evening Standard in 2004.[6]

In October 2007, a story on the BBC website featured a photo allegedly taken by a passer-by in Bethnal Green, London, purporting to show Banksy at work with an assistant, scaffolding and a truck. The story confirms that Tower Hamlets Council in London has decided to treat all Banksy works as vandalism and remove them.[78]

In July 2008, it was claimed by The Mail on Sunday that Banksy’s real name is Robin Gunningham.[3][79] His agent has refused to confirm or deny these reports.

In May 2009, the Mail on Sunday once again speculated about Gunningham being Banksy after a "self-portrait" of a rat holding a sign with the word "Gunningham" shot on it was photographed in East London.[80] This "new Banksy rat" story was also picked up by The Times[81] and the Evening Standard.

Banksy, himself, states on his website:

“I am unable to comment on who may or may not be Banksy, but anyone described as being ‘good at drawing’ doesn’t sound like Banksy to me.[82]

Controversy

In 2004, Banksy walked into the Louvre in Paris and hung on a wall a picture he had painted resembling the Mona Lisa but with a yellow smiley face. Though the painting was hurriedly removed by the museum staff, it and its counterpart, temporarily on unknown display at the Tate Britain, were described by Banksy as "shortcuts". He is quoted as saying:

“To actually [have to] go through the process of having a painting selected must be quite boring. It’s a lot more fun to go and put your own one up.[83]

Peter Gibson, a spokesperson for Keep Britain Tidy, asserts that Banksy’s work is simple vandalism,[84] and Diane Shakespeare, an official for the same organization, was quoted as saying: "We are concerned that Banksy’s street art glorifies what is essentially vandalism".[6]

In June 2007 Banksy created a circle of plastic portable toilets, said to resemble Stonehenge at the Glastonbury Festival. As this was in the same field as the "sacred circle" it was felt by many to be inappropriate and his installation was itself vandalized before the festival even opened. However, the intention had always been for people to climb on and interact with it.[citation needed] The installation was nicknamed "Portaloo Sunset" and "Bog Henge" by Festival goers. Michael Eavis admitted he wasn’t fond of it, and the portaloos were removed before the 2008 festival.

In 2010, an artistic feud developed between Banksy and his rival King Robbo after Banksy painted over a 24-year old Robbo piece on the banks of London’s Regent Canal. In retaliation several Banksy pieces in London have been painted over by ‘Team Robbo’.[85][86]

Also in 2010, government workers accidentally painted over a Banksy art piece, a famed "parachuting-rat" stencil, in Australia’s Melbourne CBD. [87]

Bibliography

Banksy has self-published several books that contain photographs of his work in various countries as well as some of his canvas work and exhibitions, accompanied by his own writings:

• Banksy, Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall (2001) ISBN 978-0-95417040-0
• Banksy, Existencilism (2002) ISBN 978-0-95417041-7
• Banksy, Cut it Out (2004) ISBN 978-0-95449600-5
• Banksy, Wall and Piece (2005) ISBN 978-1-84413786-2
• Banksy, Pictures of Walls (2005) ISBN 978-0-95519460-3

Random House published Wall and Piece in 2005. It contains a combination of images from his three previous books, as well as some new material.[16]

Two books authored by others on his work were published in 2006 & 2007:

• Martin Bull, Banksy Locations and Tours: A Collection of Graffiti Locations and Photographs in London (2006 – with new editions in 2007 and 2008) ISBN 978-0-95547120-9.
• Steve Wright, Banksy’s Bristol: Home Sweet Home (2007) ISBN 978-1906477004

External links

Official website
Banksy street work photos

Posted by Chris Devers on 2010-05-13 00:31:17

Tagged: , NO LOITRIN , Banksy , graffiti , Central , sq , square , Central Sq , Central Square , Cambridge , Cambridge MA , MA , Massachusetts , 2010 , Camera: Nikon D50 , art , Bostonist , Universal Hub , street art , exif:aperture=f/4.2 , exif:exposure=0.025 sec (1/40) , exif:exposure_bias=0 EV , exif:flash=Off, Did not fire , exif:focal_length=32 mm , camera:make=NIKON CORPORATION , meta:exif=1273714150 , Lens: 18-200VR , camera:model=NIKON D50 , meta:seen=elsewhere , flickrstats:favorites=1 , exif:filename=DSC_.JPG , exif:lens=18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 , exif:orientation=Horizontal (normal) , exif:shutter_count=43285 , exif:vari_program=Auto , meta:exif=1350398479

Banksy in Boston: Overview of the NO LOITRIN piece on Essex St in Central Square, Cambridge

Banksy in Boston: Overview of the NO LOITRIN piece on Essex St in Central Square, Cambridge

Posted via email to ☛ HoloChromaCinePhotoRamaScope‽: cdevers.posterous.com/banksy-no-loitrin.

• • • • • • • • • •

Interestingly, both of the Boston area Banksy pieces are on Essex St:

F̶O̶L̶L̶O̶W̶ ̶Y̶O̶U̶R̶ ̶D̶R̶E̶A̶M̶S̶ CANCELLED (aka chimney sweep) in Chinatown, Boston
NO LOITRIN in Central Square, Cambridge.

Does that mean anything? It looks like he favors Essex named streets & roads when he can. In 2008, he did another notable Essex work in London, for example, and posters on the Banksy Forums picked up & discussed on the Essex link as well.

Is there an Essex Street in any of the other nearby towns? It looks like there are several: Brookline, Charlestown, Chelsea, Gloucester, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lynn, Medford, Melrose, Quincy, Revere, Salem, Saugus, Somerville, Swampscott, and Waltham. Most of these seem improbable to me, other than maybe Brookline, or maybe Somerville or Charlestown. But they start getting pretty suburban after that.

But, again, why "Essex"? In a comment on this photo, Birbeck helps clarify:

I can only surmise that he’s having a ‘dig’ at Essex UK, especially with the misspelling of ‘Loitering’. Here, the general view of the urban districts in Essex: working class but with right wing views; that they’re not the most intellectual bunch; rather obsessed with fashion (well, their idea of it); their place of worship is the shopping mall; enjoy rowdy nights out; girls are thought of as being dumb, fake blonde hair/tans and promiscuous; and guys are good at the ‘chit chat’, and swagger around showing off their dosh (money).

It was also the region that once had Europe’s largest Ford motor factory. In its heyday, 1 in 3 British cars were made in Dagenham, Essex. Pay was good for such unskilled labour, generations worked mind-numbing routines on assembly lines for 80 years. In 2002 the recession ended the dream.

• • • • •

This is a scan of this Banksy photo running in the the Boston Globe on May 13, 2010. This is the first time I’ve made the newspaper with one of my photos 🙂 (The Globe later ran a longer article, titled Tag — we’re it: Banksy, the controversial and elusive street artist, left his mark here. Or did he? with a photo taken by one of their staff photographers, Essdras M. Suarez.

• This photo appeared on Grafitti – A arte das ruas on Yahoo Meme. Yes, Yahoo has a Tumblr/Posterous-esque "Meme" service now — I was as surprised as you are.

• The photo has also appeared, among other places, on CafeBabel, a European online affairs magazine based in Paris.

• • • • •

Banksy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Banksy
Birth name
Unknown

Born
1974 or 1975 (1974 or 1975), Bristol, UK[1]

Nationality
British

Field
Graffiti
Street Art
Bristol underground scene
Sculpture

Movement
Anti-Totalitarianism
Anti-capitalism
Pacifism
Anti-War
Anarchism
Atheism
Anti-Fascism

Works
Naked Man Image
One Nation Under CCTV
Anarchist Rat
Ozone’s Angel
Pulp Fiction

Banksy is a pseudonymous[2][3][4] British graffiti artist. He is believed to be a native of Yate, South Gloucestershire, near Bristol[2] and to have been born in 1974,[5] but his identity is unknown.[6] According to Tristan Manco[who?], Banksy "was born in 1974 and raised in Bristol, England. The son of a photocopier technician, he trained as a butcher but became involved in graffiti during the great Bristol aerosol boom of the late 1980s."[7] His artworks are often satirical pieces of art on topics such as politics, culture, and ethics. His street art, which combines graffiti writing with a distinctive stencilling technique, is similar to Blek le Rat, who began to work with stencils in 1981 in Paris and members of the anarcho-punk band Crass who maintained a graffiti stencil campaign on the London Tube System in the late 1970s and early 1980s. His art has appeared in cities around the world.[8] Banksy’s work was born out of the Bristol underground scene which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.

Banksy does not sell photos of street graffiti.[9] Art auctioneers have been known to attempt to sell his street art on location and leave the problem of its removal in the hands of the winning bidder.[10]

Banksy’s first film, Exit Through The Gift Shop, billed as "the world’s first street art disaster movie", made its debut at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.[11] The film was released in the UK on March 5.[12]

Contents

1 Career
•• 1.1 2000
•• 1.2 2002
•• 1.3 2003
•• 1.4 2004
•• 1.5 2005
•• 1.6 2006
•• 1.7 2007
•• 1.8 2008
•• 1.9 2009
•• 1.10 2010
2 Notable art pieces
3 Technique
4 Identity
5 Controversy
6 Bibliography
7 References
8 External links

Career

Banksy started as a freehand graffiti artist 1992–1994[14] as one of Bristol’s DryBreadZ Crew (DBZ), with Kato and Tes.[15] He was inspired by local artists and his work was part of the larger Bristol underground scene. From the start he used stencils as elements of his freehand pieces, too.[14] By 2000 he had turned to the art of stencilling after realising how much less time it took to complete a piece. He claims he changed to stencilling whilst he was hiding from the police under a train carriage, when he noticed the stencilled serial number[16] and by employing this technique, he soon became more widely noticed for his art around Bristol and London.[16]

Stencil on the waterline of The Thekla, an entertainment boat in central Bristol – (wider view). The image of Death is based on a 19th century etching illustrating the pestilence of The Great Stink.[17]

Banksy’s stencils feature striking and humorous images occasionally combined with slogans. The message is usually anti-war, anti-capitalist or anti-establishment. Subjects often include rats, monkeys, policemen, soldiers, children, and the elderly.

In late 2001, on a trip to Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, he met up with the Gen-X pastellist, visual activist, and recluse James DeWeaver in Byron Bay[clarification needed], where he stencilled a parachuting rat with a clothes peg on its nose above a toilet at the Arts Factory Lodge. This stencil can no longer be located. He also makes stickers (the Neighbourhood Watch subvert) and sculpture (the murdered phone-box), and was responsible for the cover art of Blur’s 2003 album Think Tank.

2000

The album cover for Monk & Canatella‘s Do Community Service was conceived and illustrated by Banksy, based on his contribution to the "Walls on fire" event in Bristol 1998.[18][citation needed]

2002

On 19 July 2002, Banksy’s first Los Angeles exhibition debuted at 33 1/3 Gallery, a small Silverlake venue owned by Frank Sosa. The exhibition, entitled Existencilism, was curated by 33 1/3 Gallery, Malathion, Funk Lazy Promotions, and B+.[19]

2003

In 2003 in an exhibition called Turf War, held in a warehouse, Banksy painted on animals. Although the RSPCA declared the conditions suitable, an animal rights activist chained herself to the railings in protest.[20] He later moved on to producing subverted paintings; one example is Monet‘s Water Lily Pond, adapted to include urban detritus such as litter and a shopping trolley floating in its reflective waters; another is Edward Hopper‘s Nighthawks, redrawn to show that the characters are looking at a British football hooligan, dressed only in his Union Flag underpants, who has just thrown an object through the glass window of the cafe. These oil paintings were shown at a twelve-day exhibition in Westbourne Grove, London in 2005.[21]

2004

In August 2004, Banksy produced a quantity of spoof British £10 notes substituting the picture of the Queen’s head with Princess Diana‘s head and changing the text "Bank of England" to "Banksy of England." Someone threw a large wad of these into a crowd at Notting Hill Carnival that year, which some recipients then tried to spend in local shops. These notes were also given with invitations to a Santa’s Ghetto exhibition by Pictures on Walls. The individual notes have since been selling on eBay for about £200 each. A wad of the notes were also thrown over a fence and into the crowd near the NME signing tent at The Reading Festival. A limited run of 50 signed posters containing ten uncut notes were also produced and sold by Pictures on Walls for £100 each to commemorate the death of Princess Diana. One of these sold in October 2007 at Bonhams auction house in London for £24,000.

2005

In August 2005, Banksy, on a trip to the Palestinian territories, created nine images on Israel’s highly controversial West Bank barrier. He reportedly said "The Israeli government is building a wall surrounding the occupied Palestinian territories. It stands three times the height of the Berlin Wall and will eventually run for over 700km—the distance from London to Zurich. "[22]

2006

• Banksy held an exhibition called Barely Legal, billed as a "three day vandalised warehouse extravaganza" in Los Angeles, on the weekend of 16 September. The exhibition featured a live "elephant in a room", painted in a pink and gold floral wallpaper pattern.[23]
• After Christina Aguilera bought an original of Queen Victoria as a lesbian and two prints for £25,000,[24] on 19 October 2006 a set of Kate Moss paintings sold in Sotheby’s London for £50,400, setting an auction record for Banksy’s work. The six silk-screen prints, featuring the model painted in the style of Andy Warhol‘s Marilyn Monroe pictures, sold for five times their estimated value. His stencil of a green Mona Lisa with real paint dripping from her eyes sold for £57,600 at the same auction.[25]
• In December, journalist Max Foster coined the phrase, "the Banksy Effect", to illustrate how interest in other street artists was growing on the back of Banksy’s success.[26]

2007

• On 21 February 2007, Sotheby’s auction house in London auctioned three works, reaching the highest ever price for a Banksy work at auction: over £102,000 for his Bombing Middle England. Two of his other graffiti works, Balloon Girl and Bomb Hugger, sold for £37,200 and £31,200 respectively, which were well above their estimated prices.[27] The following day’s auction saw a further three Banksy works reach soaring prices: Ballerina With Action Man Parts reached £96,000; Glory sold for £72,000; Untitled (2004) sold for £33,600; all significantly above estimated values.[28] To coincide with the second day of auctions, Banksy updated his website with a new image of an auction house scene showing people bidding on a picture that said, "I Can’t Believe You Morons Actually Buy This Shit."[6]
• In February 2007, the owners of a house with a Banksy mural on the side in Bristol decided to sell the house through Red Propeller art gallery after offers fell through because the prospective buyers wanted to remove the mural. It is listed as a mural which comes with a house attached.[29]
• In April 2007, Transport for London painted over Banksy’s iconic image of a scene from Quentin Tarantino‘s Pulp Fiction, with Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta clutching bananas instead of guns. Although the image was very popular, Transport for London claimed that the "graffiti" created "a general atmosphere of neglect and social decay which in turn encourages crime" and their staff are "professional cleaners not professional art critics".[30] Banksy tagged the same site again (pictured at right). This time the actors were portrayed as holding real guns instead of bananas, but they were adorned with banana costumes. Banksy made a tribute art piece over this second Pulp Fiction piece. The tribute was for 19-year-old British graffiti artist Ozone, who was hit by an underground train in Barking, East London, along with fellow artist Wants, on 12 January 2007.[31] The piece was of an angel wearing a bullet-proof vest, holding a skull. He also wrote a note on his website, saying:

The last time I hit this spot I painted a crap picture of two men in banana costumes waving hand guns. A few weeks later a writer called Ozone completely dogged it and then wrote ‘If it’s better next time I’ll leave it’ in the bottom corner. When we lost Ozone we lost a fearless graffiti writer and as it turns out a pretty perceptive art critic. Ozone – rest in peace.[citation needed]

Ozone’s Angel

• On 27 April 2007, a new record high for the sale of Banksy’s work was set with the auction of the work Space Girl & Bird fetching £288,000 (US$576,000), around 20 times the estimate at Bonhams of London.[32]
• On 21 May 2007 Banksy gained the award for Art’s Greatest living Briton. Banksy, as expected, did not turn up to collect his award, and continued with his notoriously anonymous status.
• On 4 June 2007, it was reported that Banksy’s The Drinker had been stolen.[33][34]
• In October 2007, most of his works offered for sale at Bonhams auction house in London sold for more than twice their reserve price.[35]

• Banksy has published a "manifesto" on his website.[36] The text of the manifesto is credited as the diary entry of one Lieutenant Colonel Mervin Willett Gonin, DSO, which is exhibited in the Imperial War Museum. It describes how a shipment of lipstick to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp immediately after its liberation at the end of World War II helped the internees regain their humanity. However, as of 18 January 2008, Banksy’s Manifesto has been substituted with Graffiti Heroes #03 that describes Peter Chappell’s graffiti quest of the 1970s that worked to free George Davis of his imprisonment.[37] By 12 August 2009 he was relying on Emo Phillips’ "When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle. Then I realised God doesn’t work that way, so I stole one and prayed for forgiveness."
• A small number of Banksy’s works can be seen in the movie Children of Men, including a stenciled image of two policemen kissing and another stencil of a child looking down a shop.
• In the 2007 film Shoot ‘Em Up starring Clive Owen, Banksy’s tag can be seen on a dumpster in the film’s credits.
• Banksy, who deals mostly with Lazarides Gallery in London, claims that the exhibition at Vanina Holasek Gallery in New York (his first major exhibition in that city) is unauthorised. The exhibition featured 62 of his paintings and prints.[38]

2008

• In March, a stencilled graffiti work appeared on Thames Water tower in the middle of the Holland Park roundabout, and it was widely attributed to Banksy. It was of a child painting the tag "Take this Society" in bright orange. London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham spokesman, Councillor Greg Smith branded the art as vandalism, and ordered its immediate removal, which was carried out by H&F council workmen within three days.[39]
• Over the weekend 3–5 May in London, Banksy hosted an exhibition called The Cans Festival. It was situated on Leake Street, a road tunnel formerly used by Eurostar underneath London Waterloo station. Graffiti artists with stencils were invited to join in and paint their own artwork, as long as it didn’t cover anyone else’s.[40] Artists included Blek le Rat, Broken Crow, C215, Cartrain, Dolk, Dotmasters, J.Glover, Eine, Eelus, Hero, Pure evil, Jef Aérosol, Mr Brainwash, Tom Civil and Roadsworth.[citation needed]
• In late August 2008, marking the third anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the associated levee failure disaster, Banksy produced a series of works in New Orleans, Louisiana, mostly on buildings derelict since the disaster.[41]
• A stencil painting attributed to Banksy appeared at a vacant petrol station in the Ensley neighbourhood of Birmingham, Alabama on 29 August as Hurricane Gustav approached the New Orleans area. The painting depicting a hooded member of the Ku Klux Klan hanging from a noose was quickly covered with black spray paint and later removed altogether.[42]
• His first official exhibition in New York, the "Village Pet Store And Charcoal Grill," opened 5 October 2008. The animatronic pets in the store window include a mother hen watching over her baby Chicken McNuggets as they peck at a barbecue sauce packet, and a rabbit putting makeup on in a mirror.[43]
• The Westminster City Council stated in October 2008 that the work "One Nation Under CCTV", painted in April 2008 will be painted over as it is graffiti. The council says it will remove any graffiti, regardless of the reputation of its creator, and specifically stated that Banksy "has no more right to paint graffiti than a child". Robert Davis, the chairman of the council planning committee told The Times newspaper: "If we condone this then we might as well say that any kid with a spray can is producing art". [44] The work was painted over in April 2009.
• In December 2008, The Little Diver, a Banksy image of a diver in a duffle coat in Melbourne Australia was vandalised. The image was protected by a sheet of clear perspex, however silver paint was poured behind the protective sheet and later tagged with the words "Banksy woz ere". The image was almost completely destroyed.[45].

2009

• May 2009, parts company with agent Steve Lazarides. Announces Pest Control [46] the handling service who act on his behalf will be the only point of sale for new works.
• On 13 June 2009, the Banksy UK Summer show opened at Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery, featuring more than 100 works of art, including animatronics and installations; it is his largest exhibition yet, featuring 78 new works.[47][48] Reaction to the show was positive, with over 8,500 visitors to the show on the first weekend.[49] Over the course of the twelve weeks, the exhibition has been visited over 300,000 times.[50]
• In September 2009, a Banksy work parodying the Royal Family was partially destroyed by Hackney Council after they served an enforcement notice for graffiti removal to the former address of the property owner. The mural had been commissioned for the 2003 Blur single "Crazy Beat" and the property owner, who had allowed the piece to be painted, was reported to have been in tears when she saw it was being painted over.[51]
• In December 2009, Banksy marked the end of the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference by painting four murals on global warming. One included "I don’t believe in global warming" which was submerged in water.[52]

2010

• The world premiere of the film Exit Through the Gift Shop occurred at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, on 24 January. He created 10 street pieces around Park City and Salt Lake City to tie in with the screening.[53]
• In February, The Whitehouse public house in Liverpool, England, is sold for £114,000 at auction.[54] The side of the building has an image of a giant rat by Banksy.[55]
• In April 2010, Melbourne City Council in Australia reported that they had inadvertently ordered private contractors to paint over the last remaining Banksy art in the city. The image was of a rat descending in a parachute adorning the wall of an old council building behind the Forum Theatre. In 2008 Vandals had poured paint over a stencil of an old-fashioned diver wearing a trenchcoat. A council spokeswoman has said they would now rush through retrospective permits to protect other “famous or significant artworks” in the city.[56]
• In April 2010 to coincide with the premier of Exit through the Gift Shop in San Francisco, 5 of his pieces appeared in various parts of the city.[57] Banksy reportedly paid a Chinatown building owner $50 for the use of their wall for one of his stencils.[58]
• In May 2010 to coincide with the release of "Exit Through the Gift Shop" in Chicago, one piece appeared in the city.

Notable art pieces

In addition to his artwork, Banksy has claimed responsibility for a number of high profile art pieces, including the following:

• At London Zoo, he climbed into the penguin enclosure and painted "We’re bored of fish" in seven foot high letters.[59]
• At Bristol Zoo, he left the message ‘I want out. This place is too cold. Keeper smells. Boring, boring, boring.’ in the elephant enclosure.[60]
• In March 2005, he placed subverted artworks in the Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York.[61]
• He put up a subverted painting in London’s Tate Britain gallery.
• In May 2005 Banksy’s version of a primitive cave painting depicting a human figure hunting wildlife whilst pushing a shopping trolley was hung in gallery 49 of the British Museum, London. Upon discovery, they added it to their permanent collection.[62]

Near Bethlehem – 2005

• Banksy has sprayed "This is not a photo opportunity" on certain photograph spots.
• In August 2005, Banksy painted nine images on the Israeli West Bank barrier, including an image of a ladder going up and over the wall and an image of children digging a hole through the wall.[22][63][64][65]

See also: Other Banksy works on the Israeli West Bank barrier

• In April 2006, Banksy created a sculpture based on a crumpled red phone box with a pickaxe in its side, apparently bleeding, and placed it in a street in Soho, London. It was later removed by Westminster Council. BT released a press release, which said: "This is a stunning visual comment on BT’s transformation from an old-fashioned telecommunications company into a modern communications services provider."[66]
• In June 2006, Banksy created an image of a naked man hanging out of a bedroom window on a wall visible from Park Street in central Bristol. The image sparked some controversy, with the Bristol City Council leaving it up to the public to decide whether it should stay or go.[67] After an internet discussion in which 97% (all but 6 people) supported the stencil, the city council decided it would be left on the building.[67] The mural was later defaced with paint.[67]
• In August/September 2006, Banksy replaced up to 500 copies of Paris Hilton‘s debut CD, Paris, in 48 different UK record stores with his own cover art and remixes by Danger Mouse. Music tracks were given titles such as "Why am I Famous?", "What Have I Done?" and "What Am I For?". Several copies of the CD were purchased by the public before stores were able to remove them, some going on to be sold for as much as £750 on online auction websites such as eBay. The cover art depicted Paris Hilton digitally altered to appear topless. Other pictures feature her with a dog’s head replacing her own, and one of her stepping out of a luxury car, edited to include a group of homeless people, which included the caption "90% of success is just showing up".[68][69][70]
• In September 2006, Banksy dressed an inflatable doll in the manner of a Guantanamo Bay detainment camp prisoner (orange jumpsuit, black hood, and handcuffs) and then placed the figure within the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad ride at the Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, California.[71][72]

Technique

Asked about his technique, Banksy said:

“I use whatever it takes. Sometimes that just means drawing a moustache on a girl’s face on some billboard, sometimes that means sweating for days over an intricate drawing. Efficiency is the key.[73]

Stencils are traditionally hand drawn or printed onto sheets of acetate or card, before being cut out by hand. Because of the secretive nature of Banksy’s work and identity, it is uncertain what techniques he uses to generate the images in his stencils, though it is assumed he uses computers for some images due to the photocopy nature of much of his work.

He mentions in his book, Wall and Piece, that as he was starting to do graffiti, he was always too slow and was either caught or could never finish the art in the one sitting. So he devised a series of intricate stencils to minimise time and overlapping of the colour.

Identity

Banksy’s real name has been widely reported to be Robert or Robin Banks.[74][75][76] His year of birth has been given as 1974.[62]

Simon Hattenstone from Guardian Unlimited is one of the very few people to have interviewed him face-to-face. Hattenstone describes him as "a cross of Jimmy Nail and British rapper Mike Skinner" and "a 28 year old male who showed up wearing jeans and a t-shirt with a silver tooth, silver chain, and one silver earring".[77] In the same interview, Banksy revealed that his parents think their son is a painter and decorator.[77]

In May 2007, an extensive article written by Lauren Collins of the New Yorker re-opened the Banksy-identity controversy citing a 2004 photograph of the artist that was taken in Jamaica during the Two-Culture Clash project and later published in the Evening Standard in 2004.[6]

In October 2007, a story on the BBC website featured a photo allegedly taken by a passer-by in Bethnal Green, London, purporting to show Banksy at work with an assistant, scaffolding and a truck. The story confirms that Tower Hamlets Council in London has decided to treat all Banksy works as vandalism and remove them.[78]

In July 2008, it was claimed by The Mail on Sunday that Banksy’s real name is Robin Gunningham.[3][79] His agent has refused to confirm or deny these reports.

In May 2009, the Mail on Sunday once again speculated about Gunningham being Banksy after a "self-portrait" of a rat holding a sign with the word "Gunningham" shot on it was photographed in East London.[80] This "new Banksy rat" story was also picked up by The Times[81] and the Evening Standard.

Banksy, himself, states on his website:

“I am unable to comment on who may or may not be Banksy, but anyone described as being ‘good at drawing’ doesn’t sound like Banksy to me.[82]

Controversy

In 2004, Banksy walked into the Louvre in Paris and hung on a wall a picture he had painted resembling the Mona Lisa but with a yellow smiley face. Though the painting was hurriedly removed by the museum staff, it and its counterpart, temporarily on unknown display at the Tate Britain, were described by Banksy as "shortcuts". He is quoted as saying:

“To actually [have to] go through the process of having a painting selected must be quite boring. It’s a lot more fun to go and put your own one up.[83]

Peter Gibson, a spokesperson for Keep Britain Tidy, asserts that Banksy’s work is simple vandalism,[84] and Diane Shakespeare, an official for the same organization, was quoted as saying: "We are concerned that Banksy’s street art glorifies what is essentially vandalism".[6]

In June 2007 Banksy created a circle of plastic portable toilets, said to resemble Stonehenge at the Glastonbury Festival. As this was in the same field as the "sacred circle" it was felt by many to be inappropriate and his installation was itself vandalized before the festival even opened. However, the intention had always been for people to climb on and interact with it.[citation needed] The installation was nicknamed "Portaloo Sunset" and "Bog Henge" by Festival goers. Michael Eavis admitted he wasn’t fond of it, and the portaloos were removed before the 2008 festival.

In 2010, an artistic feud developed between Banksy and his rival King Robbo after Banksy painted over a 24-year old Robbo piece on the banks of London’s Regent Canal. In retaliation several Banksy pieces in London have been painted over by ‘Team Robbo’.[85][86]

Also in 2010, government workers accidentally painted over a Banksy art piece, a famed "parachuting-rat" stencil, in Australia’s Melbourne CBD. [87]

Bibliography

Banksy has self-published several books that contain photographs of his work in various countries as well as some of his canvas work and exhibitions, accompanied by his own writings:

• Banksy, Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall (2001) ISBN 978-0-95417040-0
• Banksy, Existencilism (2002) ISBN 978-0-95417041-7
• Banksy, Cut it Out (2004) ISBN 978-0-95449600-5
• Banksy, Wall and Piece (2005) ISBN 978-1-84413786-2
• Banksy, Pictures of Walls (2005) ISBN 978-0-95519460-3

Random House published Wall and Piece in 2005. It contains a combination of images from his three previous books, as well as some new material.[16]

Two books authored by others on his work were published in 2006 & 2007:

• Martin Bull, Banksy Locations and Tours: A Collection of Graffiti Locations and Photographs in London (2006 – with new editions in 2007 and 2008) ISBN 978-0-95547120-9.
• Steve Wright, Banksy’s Bristol: Home Sweet Home (2007) ISBN 978-1906477004

External links

Official website
Banksy street work photos

Posted by Chris Devers on 2010-05-12 22:39:13

Tagged: , NO LOITRIN , Banksy , graffiti , Central , sq , square , Central Sq , Central Square , Cambridge , Cambridge MA , MA , Massachusetts , 2010 , Camera: iPhone , art , Bostonist , Universal Hub , street art , exif:aperture=f/2.8 , exif:flash=No flash function , camera:make=Apple , meta:exif=1273714167 , favorite , camera:model=iPhone , meta:seen=elsewhere , flickrstats:favorites=1 , flickrstats:galleries=1 , exif:filename=DSC_.JPG , meta:exif=1350398490

Die Antwoord (9)

Die Antwoord (9)

SYDNEY BIG DAY OUT 2011

BIG DAY OUT 2011 FEATURING: TOOL, RAMMSTEIN, IGGY AND THE STOOGES, M.I.A, JOHN BUTLER TRIO, GRINDERMAN, WOLFMOTHER, LCD SOUNDSYSTEM, BLOODY BEETROOTS DEATH CREW 77, CRYSTAL CASTLES, LUPE FIASCO, PRIMAL SCREAM SCREAMADELICA LIVE, DEFTONES, BLISS N ESO, ANGUS & JULIA STONE, PLAN B, PNAU, DIE ANTWOORD, EDWARD SHARPE & THE MAGNETIC ZEROS, BOOKA SHADE DJs, ANDREW W.K., THE JIM JONES REVUE, BIRDS OF TOKYO, LITTLE RED, GYROSCOPE, VITALIC, CSS, RATATAT, AIRBOURNE, DEAD LETTER CIRCUS, BLUE KING BROWN, THE NAKED & FAMOUS, OPERATOR PLEASE, CHILDREN COLLIDE, GYPSY AND THE CAT, WILL STYLES, LOWRIDER, SAMPOLOGY, KIDS OF 88, KID KENOBI & MC SHURESHOCK.

2010 was one for the record books and a stellar year for BDO.

We not only passed the emotional 100 show mark with a bang, but also staged our biggest shows to the largest and our most respectful audiences of our 18 years of BDO. And so we thank you for your continued support in helping us produce the best and safest event possible for the patrons, the bands and our tireless team.

The more you care: the more we care.

Which brings us to 2011.

2010 is a very hard act to follow, so for 2011 it felt right to turn up the heat musically and visually. And what better way to explain this than to present you with over 40 exceptional acts from home and abroad for the first round alone.

This is by far our biggest and most diverse announcement ever. As well as the many incredible first timers on offer, we are enthusiastically welcoming back several iconic BDO veterans. They are some of the most exciting and uncompromising artists performing live today. We believe this combination of extremes for 2011 will create a spectacular event.

From the heaviest to the sweetest sounds in the world today, this will be a sensory overload not to be missed.

Full tickets details are below, but please remember the policies we’ve built your show on: You’re all VIPs (Very Important Punters). We don’t do elitist or bogus pre-sales: we’re either on sale or we’re not. We have what we believe to be one low ticket price for one high standard for everyone….

And we hope to see you there

Ken and Viv

So, let’s get it rolling…

TOOL

The sky will blacken, the ground will shudder, the earth will open up and BIG DAY OUT will once again tremble in the presence of the awe-inspiring TOOL. “Primal, poignant, poetic and, as always, utterly powerful” (ARTISTdirect, July 2010). Touring Down Under for the first time in four years, vocalist Maynard James Keenan, guitarist Adam Jones, drummer Danny Carey and bassist Justin Chancellor will be fresh from the studio, where they have been slowly crafting a follow-up to 2006’s 10,000 Days. From Lateralus to Stinkfist, you know the music. But, backed by a video and laser light show unlike any other, TOOL live is also “the kind of visual experience you’ll probably never have again” (CHARTattack, August 2009). Unmatched in the world of dark, heavy rock, California’s TOOL have over 20 years scorched themselves a place as “one of the best live bands in history” (ARTISTdirect). Be blinded by their light at BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

RAMMSTEIN

A decade since ruling over BIG DAY OUT with a reign of fire, pyrotechnics, monstrous riffs, wicked humour and industrial savagery, RAMMSTEIN will return this summer to reclaim their sovereign territory. The RAMMSTEIN live experience is “dizzyingly ridiculous”, says the BBC. “Rock is at its best when confrontational, subversive, curiously camp and bold, which is why RAMMSTEIN are currently one of the most important bands in the genre.” Armed with their sixth album, Liebe ist für Alle da, Germany’s infamous techno-metal masters bring nothing less than the greatest show on earth: “RAMMSTEIN are in pulverising form, the crowd are going crazy, the atmosphere is electric and the firebombs launching from the stage are like World War III on apocalypse LSD” (The Quietus, February 2010). Bow down to your kings, BIG DAY OUT 2011, for RAMMSTEIN have returned. (ALL SHOWS)

IGGY AND THE STOOGES

It’s time for a new generation to plug in to the raw power of IGGY AND THE STOOGES at BIG DAY OUT 2011. The band that invented punk rock return with iconic frontman Iggy Pop rejoined by guitarist James Williamson, drummer Scott Asheton, bass player Mike Watt and sax player Steve Mackay. IGGY AND THE STOOGES will be performing songs from their landmark 1973 album Raw Power, and cherry-picking the likes of Fun House, I Wanna Be Your Dog and Down On The Street from their incendiary back catalogue. Kurt Cobain consistently listed Raw Power as his #1 favorite album of all time and Jack White will tell you that Fun House is the best rock and roll album ever made! It’s “the most chaotic and beautiful mess you could ever want” (Boston Herald, September 2010). As Iggy says, “The Stooges and I are cocked and loaded to deliver it live on stage.” And the only place to see IGGY AND THE STOOGES deliver it this summer is at BIG DAY OUT. Don’t be the one to say you missed it. (ALL SHOWS)

M.I.A.

Standing at the front line of mission BIG DAY OUT 2011 is the one-woman shock and awe campaign that is M.I.A. The Sri Lankan-British “singer/rapper/firebrand” (Pitchfork) fearlessly cuts through genre boundaries and lyrical taboos, blazing new ground from the clubs to the streets with powerhouse tracks like Galang, Paper Planes and, from her latest album ///Y/, Born Free and XXXO. On record and on stage, M.I.A. delivers “pure, flashing brilliance, a lightning cognitive connection of word, idea and sound that few do so well” (NME, July 2010). Often controversial, always compelling, M.I.A knows only one way: all guns blazing. Take cover, BIG DAY OUT. (ALL SHOWS)

JOHN BUTLER TRIO

John Butler is undeniably the most successful truly independent artist in Australia. The recent rebirth of his band the JOHN BUTLER TRIO saw two new members join John Butler; Nicky Bomba on drums and Byron Luiters on bass. The title for the trio’s latest album April Uprising is all about a period of change, of evolution and a constantly renewing beginning. April Uprising is John’s most focused, diverse and accessible album to date. Between the epic opening track Revolution and a whispered acoustic coda A Star is Born, dedicated to John’s son, April Uprising is an album that combines the personal, the political and the musically memorable with skill and passion. BIG DAY OUT is very excited to welcome back JOHN BUTLER TRIO. (ALL SHOWS)

GRINDERMAN

BIG DAY OUT is shivering with anticipation as the howling, growling, malevolent rock beast that is GRINDERMAN approaches. GRINDERMAN are Nick Cave, Warren Ellis, Martyn Casey and Jim Sclavunos – Four Bad Seeds on a mission to take us somewhere else entirely. On album No.1 they were equal parts swagger and sexual frustration. On Grinderman 2, they’re simply ravenous and rampaging, “mixing horror and black humour with barely tamed musical malevolence” (The Guardian, September 2010). Fronted by Australia’s unarguable king of intense, intimidating performance, GRINDERMAN are coming to draw out the heathen child in all of us at BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

WOLFMOTHER

Brothers and sisters sound the siren. A new moon has risen and the return of WOLFMOTHER is well and truly upon us. It was a whirlwind journey the band went on with the Wolfmother album, a voyage that resulted in over one million sales, sold out riots disguised as shows the world over, multiple ARIA Awards and a Grammy. In 2009 they regrouped and returned with a thundering 2nd record, Cosmic Egg, which they describe as “the sound of the Wolfmother world being rethunk and cracked wide open, with a sprawling, jubilant galaxy of musical and metaphysical harmony spilling forth”. We couldn’t have put it better ourselves and BIG DAY OUT couldn’t be happier to have them cracking it open again in 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

LCD SOUNDSYSTEM

You thought it was all over, but James Murphy’s genre-mashing LCD SOUNDSYSTEM couldn’t farewell the live arena without one last tilt at BIG DAY OUT 2011. The biggest name in punk-funk for much of the last decade, LCD SOUNDSYSTEM is a “disco-ticking-time-bomb” (OC Weekly) that has done everything – from movie soundtracks to Grammy-nominated albums. Now, after winning raves for third album This is Happening, Murphy is about to flick LCD’s ‘off’ switch. But before he does, LCD SOUNDSYSTEM wanna put some dance, party and soul in your world one last time, via the likes of Drunk Girls, North American Scum and Daft Punk is Playing at My House. And they’ll be bringing “the heavy artillery… “More muscular and frenzied than on record, the LCD seven-piece live line-up avoids the ‘live dance music’ cul-de-sac in favour of a looser, more dynamic sound… Wow” (The List, May 2010). You better believe this is happening – so be sure to get enough LCD SOUNDSYSTEM to last you a lifetime at BIG DAY OUT this summer. (ALL SHOWS)

BLOODY BEETROOTS DEATH CREW 77

BIG DAY OUT has seen the future of dance music, and it goes by the name of BLOODY BEETROOTS DEATH CREW 77. Bob Rifo’s Italian gang may be DJs, prolific producers, masked avengers and remixers extraordinaire, but this summer it will be BLOODY BEETROOTS DEATH CREW 77 invading the Boiler Room. This isn’t just a live set, this is live communal anarchy, an electro punk rave-up that has made BLOODY BEETROOTS DEATH CREW 77 one of the most talked about dance music acts on the planet. Madly energetic, or just plain mad? Whatever the answer, you’ll be showing mad love for BLOODY BEETROOTS DEATH CREW 77 by the time they’re done with BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

CRYSTAL CASTLES

Get ready to get messy with CRYSTAL CASTLES at BIG DAY OUT 2011. Toronto’s electronic experimentalists Ethan Kath and Alice Glass are purveyors of the most frenetic live show on the planet. “It’s a thrillingly anarchic, messy show … all over the place, and all the better for it” (MusicOMH, June 2010). The whispers about CRYSTAL CASTLES began in 2006, a series of limited, lo-fi vinyl singles selling as quickly as they were pressed. Two self-titled albums later, the whisper is a roar. Or maybe that’s just Glass’s “hellish shriek backed by warzone beats and liquid synths”. Shield your ears – CRYSTAL CASTLES will bring the noise at BIG DAY OUT this summer. (AUCKLAND & EAST COAST ONLY)

LUPE FIASCO

If BIG DAY OUT is beamin’, it’s because we’re psyched to be welcoming back hip hop superstar LUPE FIASCO. The MC with the madly energetic, fast-flowin’ live-band show kicked and pushed outta Chicago with two Grammy-nominated albums, Food & Liquor and The Cool. Since last hitting these shores, LUPE has wrapped a new album, Lasers. But where is it? Singles I’m Beamin’ and Shining Down were a tasty tease, yet the album proper remains so damn anticipated that the rapper’s fans have resorted to petitioning his label to have it released. That’s just the kind of passion LUPE FIASCO inspires, and that’s why we’re beamin’ to have him back at BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

PRIMAL SCREAM

20 years after taking the sounds and spirit of the second summer of love and acid house and melding it into one of the greatest albums of the 1990s, British rockers PRIMAL SCREAM will remake history by performing their epoch-defining classic Screamadelica in full at BIG DAY OUT 2011. Two decades on, these songs still sound like the future: Loaded, Movin’ On Up, Higher Than the Sun, Come Together, Don’t Fight it, Feel It. Bobby Gillespie and the band will be joined by gospel singers, horn section, and a field full of memories. Come together to see PRIMAL SCREAM do Screamadelica at BIG DAY OUT. (ALL SHOWS)

DEFTONES

BIG DAY OUT is daring to look deep into the Diamond Eyes of California’s favourite alt-metal sons, DEFTONES. The 2010 release and sixth album, is “a brilliant, invigorating reintroduction” (NME) to Chino Moreno, Stephen Carpenter, Frank Delgado, Abe Cunningham and new bassist Sergio Vega – the men who shook the world a decade ago with the groundbreaking White Pony – still “wield that balance between beauty and brutality better than anyone” (ARTISTdirect, August 2010). So brace yourself for extremes as you prepare to witness the long-awaited return of DEFTONES at BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

BLISS N ESO

Fresh from knocking off Eminem’s six week reign at the top of the ARIA Album Charts, with their fourth album Running on Air Aussie hip hop trio BLISS N ESO are self assuredly demanding your ears when they hit the stage at BIG DAY OUT 2011. This is music made to fill the wide open spaces of BIG DAY OUT: “This is a career defining album; an album by which every new hip-hop release in this country will be judged, and deservedly so” says The Vine, MX added “Running on Air is a rocket that never runs out of fuel.” Hip-hop style stadium singalongs? We think yes. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

ANGUS & JULIA STONE

Australia’s finest duo ANGUS & JULIA STONE have spent the last few years on a remarkable musical journey together and now they bring their lovingly crafted songs to BIG DAY OUT 2011. Their latest album Down the Way was released to critical acclaim mainly due to the subtle shift of gear, represented by a growing confidence in their abilities as artists which has seen the music follow suit. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

PLAN B

BIG DAY OUT is reverting to PLAN B. But Ben Drew is no back-up plan, he’s the recalcitrant renaissance man of British music: rapper, actor, guitarist, storyteller, filmmaker and now chart-topping soul singer. After shocking the nation with his 2006 debut Who Needs Action When You Got Words, PLAN B took a sharp turn with The Defamation of Strickland Banks, a surprising, slick album filled with “stonking tunes” (NME) that trace the rise and fall of a smartly-suited soul singer. But don’t be fooled – this sweet soul morsel has a razor-sharp edge. Quite simply, no one else cuts it like PLAN B, and he’s suiting up for BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

PNAU

As the world now knows, Australia’s electronic / pop crossover pioneers, PNAU did make the big move over two years ago to take up residence in London following on from a life changing moment crossing paths with (and now under the guidance of) the pop maestro himself, Sir Elton John. It’s been three long years since the release of their last spectacular self titled album, with which Messr’s Nick Littlemore and Peter Mayes have been incredibly busy traipsing the world completing album number four in studios in London, Atlanta, New York and Los Angeles, as well as having been involved in array of projects including one half of Empire Of The Sun; production jobs for Groove Armada, Ellie Goulding, Robbie Williams and more. In amongst this worldly action, Nick has been given the auspicious duty of composer and musical director for the famed international production Cirque du Soleil. With the wait now over and the highly anticipated fourth album arriving shortly, it’s time for PNAU to present the next chapter of ‘their brilliant career’ and as such the rumours can be confirmed as PNAU finally return home to Australia in January 2011 for the BIG DAY OUT. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

DIE ANTWOORD

Comin’ straight outta Cape Town to BIG DAY OUT 2011 are South Africa’s interweb-conquering, next level, hip hop heroes DIE ANTWOORD. The hard rhyming Ninja, Yo-Landi Vi$$er and DJ Hi-Tek burst on to the scene with serious gangsta skillz and viral videos for Enter the Ninja and Zef Side, then quickly became the “so zef, so fresh” smash hit of Coachella 2010 – “Pound for pound the most engaging and legitimately surprising act of the weekend,” said the LA Times. Part anarchic art project, part the-future-of-rap, total mystery. Are DIE ANTWOORD for real? Find the answer at BIG DAY OUT this summer. (ALL SHOWS)

EDWARD SHARPE & THE MAGNETIC ZEROS

With their magic tour bus painted all the colours of the rainbow and their fearless leader at the wheel, EDWARD SHARPE & THE MAGNETIC ZEROS are on the road to BIG DAY OUT 2011. The (at least!) ten-strong, Hottest 100-conquering neo-hippie combo from California are putting a skip in the step of the world with smile-inducing songs from the name-making Home to the happy-go-lucky Janglin’ and 40 Day Dream. This is the stuff group singalongs are made of, music to bring people together. As the Denver Post put it: “At an Edward Sharpe show, everybody is family.” So get on board with EDWARD SHARPE & THE MAGNETIC ZEROES – next stop, BIG DAY OUT. You’ll feel right at home. (ALL SHOWS)

BOOKA SHADE DJs

Berlin duo Walter Merziger and Arno Kammermeier are BOOKA SHADE DJs – Get Physical label bosses, producers of immense electronic club music, newly-minted DJs. At BIG DAY OUT 2011, it’s BOOKA SHADE in DJ guise that’ll take to the Boiler Room. A BOOKA SHADE DJs set isn’t just about flinging vinyl onto a turntable – “Bringing together new tracks and new beats and creating something new around it, is more the spirit of our music,” says Kammermeier. It’s also about capturing the feeling of a great party. Grab the feeling and don’t let go with BOOKA SHADE DJs at BIG DAY OUT this summer. (ALL SHOWS)

ANDREW W.K.

When it’s time to party, BIG DAY OUT knows exactly who to consult – the ultimate authority on partying hard, ANDREW W.K. Infamous for his bloody nose, highly regarded for his motivational speaking, famous for his high-life attitude, beloved for his songs like Party Hard, She is Beautiful and It’s Time To Party, New Yorker ANDREW W.K. is coming our way with his full band for the first time ever to create feelings of pure joy, fun, freedom, and possibility. How does he do it? “His fast and hard party anthems whip the crowd into a fist pumping frenzy … ANDREW W.K. takes command of the crowd and bids them to live it up while they can” (mxdwn, September 2010). So, what are you waiting for? It’s time to party. It’s time for ANDREW W.K. to take command at BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

THE JIM JONES REVUE

THE JIM JONES REVUE will be burning the house down at BIG DAY OUT 2011. THE JIM JONES REVUE manifesto is simple, and ferocious: "If you’re going to get on stage,” says guitarist Rupert Orton, “deliver." And that they do, riffing on Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis for a rock’n’roll sound that could have come direct from the 1950s, if it wasn’t fused with the so dang wild, loud and loose vibes of The Cramps and The Birthday Party. The Londoners may have only dropped their debut in 2008, but don’t let that fool you – these five punk rock bluesmen have been around. Hot on the heels of their blistering second album, Burning Down Your House, THE JIM JONES REVUE are set to fire up BIG DAY OUT this summer. (ALL SHOWS)

BIRDS OF TOKYO

BIRDS OF TOKYO certainly aren’t the kind of band to do things in halves. Their latest self –titled album was recorded between Sydney, London, Gothenburg and New York; BIRDS OF TOKYO gave themselves the most surreal and inspiring experience possible, knowing that the results of doing so would speak for themselves. This journey into such deeply personal territory has produced BIRDS OF TOKYO’s most meaningful and powerful album yet. Stand up and be counted at BIG DAY OUT 2011 with BIRDS OF TOKYO. (ALL SHOWS)

LITTLE RED

Melbourne’s LITTLE RED have been away a while, growing up, growing down, tasting the sweet and the bittersweet in equal measures, they’ve recently returned with their second album Midnight Remember. Described by The Age as ‘pretty much the best band in Melbourne at the moment’, LITTLE RED and their all-singing, all-dancing live show are set to shake up BIG DAY OUT 2011 with their pure, irrepressible pop, infectious hooks and good times. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

GYROSCOPE

No strangers to the BIG DAY OUT GYROSCOPE is bringing something new to the table this time and it’s not what you would expect. You would be forgiven for thinking that they would stick with what seems like a formula for success. But for something to succeed you don’t need a formula – you need a solid foundation on which everything can be built. And few in music have set a foundation as strong as GYROSCOPE. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

VITALIC.

The temperature gauge is rising as BIG DAY OUT ushers in the artist who ushered in a whole new era of dance music, VITALIC. The man born Pascal Arbez has always been one step ahead of the electro game, his 2005 debut OK Cowboy preceding the rise to worldwide dance-dominance of every other Frenchman with a laptop. In 2009, he re-stamped his authority on the scene with the highly-charged Flashmob. Using big synths, big beats and a big slice of glittery disco as his building blocks, VITALIC creates a sound as pulverising as it is infectious. No messing around – “This guy is incredible” (inthemix, November 2008). Keep up if you can, as VITALIC flashes forward at BIG DAY OUT this summer. (ALL SHOWS)

CSS

Representin’ for São Paulo at BIG DAY OUT 2011 are Brazil’s hot, hot band of the people, CSS. “The physical embodiment of the best party ever” (NME), CSS have shared their unquenchable thirst for good times and all things pop and art via two albums, Cansei de Ser Sexy and Donkey. On the eve of the release of their next blast of post-punk-electro-art-school madness, CSS are back to doing what they do best – creating unbridled joy live on stage, in a set that’s equal parts dance party, urban circus, and out-and-out chaos. As the band’s technicolour frontwoman Lovefoxx would say: get up, get up, get up! Get up, and get your CSS while it’s hot at BIG DAY OUT. (ALL SHOWS)

RATATAT

When BIG DAY OUT is rockin’, RATATAT will come a’knockin’. New York duo Mike Stroud and Evan Mast have been mixing electronics with guitars for the past decade, combining the power of noise and dance, collaborating with Kid Cudi, remixing Bjork, dropping four albums. Songs like Lex, Wild Cats and Seventeen Years have made them completely hip, but it’s when you see RATATAT live on stage – an aural, visual and physical assault of synths, guitar, hypnotic video and boundless energy – that the hype makes perfect sense. If you’re ready to be blown away, you’re ready for RATATAT at BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

AIRBOURNE

AIRBOURNE have been waving the rock and roll flag for Australia both at home and overseas since 2003. AIRBOURNE crank out with all cylinders firing potent, solid and good ol’ fashioned rock and roll. “Basically, we’ve never been about having a specific message; we don’t talk about politics or social injustices in our songs. There are other bands out there to take care of that,” says rowdy lead guitarist and vocalist Joel O‘Keefe. The band’s latest album No Guts, No Glory is a true testament to AIRBOURNE’s way of life: the album is a virtual rock and roll buffet served up this summer at BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL SHOWS)

DEAD LETTER CIRCUS

It’s been a few years since DEAD LETTER CIRCUS blasted onto Australian airwaves in 2007, their bombastic yet nuanced take on alternative rock left most observers struggling to process what they were hearing. It was epic, it oozed confidence, it was intense. Fast forward a while and the band then set out to record the follow up to their self-titled EP that started it all. Over an incredible 18 month gestation period, with every deadline pushed, every note analysed, every resource pooled, and every avenue of exploration exhausted, the new album This Is The Warning was born. From one travelling circus to another we make way for DEAD LETTER CIRCUS to come play BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

BLUE KING BROWN

You can put your fist in the air, come just as you are, you can bounce to da beat, rock out up the front row or chill up the back. Hard hitting lyrics and groove delivered in the most accessible way…you’re at BIG DAY OUT 2011 and Australia’s premier urban roots crew BLUE KING BROWN have arrived! Lead by the multi talented, relentless energy of Natalie Pa’apa’a, the band have established themselves as one of Australia’s most engaging live acts. BLUE KING BROWN bringing groove to BIG DAY OUT this summer. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

THE NAKED AND FAMOUS

The meteoric rise of THE NAKED AND FAMOUS has been the biggest story in New Zealand music in 2010. The group had already won over alternative radio ears in their home country with two EPs where a home studio full of industrial strength electronica ideas underpinned some of the most melodic dream pop concocted down under, before they unleashed single Young Blood in May. But were they ready for that song to go straight into the NZ charts at number one, hook them up with NY indie label and blog Neon Gold, hit playlists from Triple J to London’s XFM, win them the prestigious APRA Silver Scroll and make them one of the hottest unsigned properties in the world? Probably not. But their self-produced album, Passive Me Aggressive You, has since appeared and garnered even more praise. Nudity? Not in public. Fame? Most definitely around the corner for these five kids from Auckland. (ALL SHOWS)

OPERATOR PLEASE

Returning to the BIG DAY OUT national tour for their second time OPERATOR PLEASE are well and truly back. This time though, take everything you think you know about OPERATOR PLEASE and put it aside. The Queensland-based band defy all expectations on their second album, Gloves, with the youthful enthusiasm and teenage angst that gave them worldwide recognition making way for a more sophisticated and developed sound. After spending the last few years touring the globe the band bring their pop anthems along for the ride and are set to rock BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

CHILDREN COLLIDE

CHILDREN COLLIDE arrive for BIG DAY OUT 2011 on the back of their powerful new album Theory for Everything. Vocalist and guitarist Johnny Mackay says "Alchemy and chemistry, reason and religion, love and logic. Art and music are so often about tying opposing forces together into a contentious dualism. Contradiction is a big part of what we do." CHILDREN COLLIDE are here. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

GYPSY & THE CAT

There is no gypsy and there is no cat, but there is a GYPSY & THE CAT, an electronic duo who, instead of pumping out house beats and booty-quaking bass lines, pen gorgeous mini epics of forlorn beauty and elegiac romanticism that, you can just tell, are about heartache and solitude, past girlfriends and future loss. Their brand new album Gilgamesh is set for release this summer. In the meantime the lead single Time to Wander has been described as “…dreamy, epic and luscious soft rock, just in time to soundtrack the Summer. Bam” (The Brag). GYPSY & THE CAT bring their summer soundtrack to BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

WILL STYLES

WILL STYLES first discovered “The Rave” when he was 16. At the end of the night he was moshing on the dance floor with his Skid Row t-shirt and torn jeans, whirling 2 flannies above his head, yelling along to Speed Racer. He was hooked. He’s always tried (often spectacularly badly) to play rave in FunkTrust sets, but after taking awhile he’s finally playing rave music every week: like a shitty Nicholas Sparks novel-turned-movie, he’s been re-united with his first love. Will has hosted Radio FunkTrust on Triple J since 2006. Every Friday night you can tune in to him playing super-sweet new records and making fart jokes. WILL STYLES is joined for the BIG DAY OUT shows by MC HAYLEY BOA. She used to sing in one of The Wiggles shows and was reprimanded for incorrectly miming the actions during the Eat a Banana song. Instead of peeling it, she was (quite innocently) fellating the banana to tens of thousands of small children. No one has been able to convince her to re-enact her banana antics on stage yet, but we’re hoping it happens at BIG DAY OUT in 2011. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

LOWRIDER

Bigger. Brighter. Bolder: Just three words to nail the irresistible sound of hot Adelaide quartet LOWRIDER’s sophomore album, Round the World. LOWRIDER have taken their unique blend of soul and funk to the world, forging a reputation along the way as one of the most mesmerising live acts around. Get soulful, get funky, get LOWRIDER on the menu this summer at BIG DAY OUT 2011. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

SAMPOLOGY

SAMPOLOGY is a DJ. And we’re not talking your steak and three vegie solid club set here. He’s a highly accomplished technician on the 1s and 2s, (and sometime 3s) cutting his teeth in the early days as turntablist for a number of live bands including Soma Rasa and the Vinyl Slingers, which saw him first doing BIG DAY OUT at the tender young age of 17. He’s also one of the most consistently brilliant and versatile club Djs who’s not shy of mixing up his styles to suit the show. One week you might find him creating mash-up mayhem in intimate clubs by changing the vibe of the room to some kind of ridiculously wicked house party. The next week you’ll stumble into a bass bin laden club night to find him delivering a fast paced performance, skilfully bringing together endless forms of club music at countless tempos. And he’s bringing the whole swag to BIG DAY OUT in 2011. In the words of Peaches: “Sampology makes me wanna break dance.” We couldn’t have summed up SAMPOLOGY the DJ better ourselves. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

KIDS OF 88

Jordan and Sam were born in 1988. In 2009, they were the toast of the music world with the chart conquering disco sleaze of their platinum selling debut single My House. They followed up with a string of throbbing electro anthems culminating in the release of the insanely catchy, wildly electric journey of 21st century dance pop discovery that is their 2010 debut album Sugarpills. As their recordings and remixes have been filling club dance floors, KIDS OF 88 have since smashed their way around New Zealand and Australia, lighting up clubs and sharing the stage with everyone from the Passion Pit and Scissor Sisters to Cassette Kids while ducking back to their home studio to remix stars like Ke$ha and Cobra Starship. (ALL SHOWS)

KID KENOBI AND MC SHURESHOCK

At the turn of the decade, KID KENOBI AND MC SHURESHOCK first joined forces and by the middle of the 2000s, they were recognized as Australia’s premier MC-DJ tandems, having completed sell-out tours of the UK, USA, Canada, Brazil, China, Switzerland, New Zealand and Singapore. Celebrating a decade of working together since the turn of the millennium, KID KENOBI & MC SHURESHOCK will release their debut EP TEN” on 10.10.10 supported by a very special TEN tour incorporating a retrospective 2000-2010 performance across a whopping 23 dates nationally, and culminating with BIG DAY OUT across Australia in early 2011. (ALL AUSTRALIAN SHOWS)

Posted by Troy Constable Photography™ on 2011-01-27 09:40:11

Tagged:

518731356

518731356

Red telephone booth in London

Posted by rAmce.h on 2017-02-14 15:55:33

Tagged: , Architecture , Architecture And Buildings , Big Ben , British Culture , Building Exterior , Built Structure , City Of Westminster , City life , Clear Sky , Communication , Concepts And Ideas , Cultures , Dusk , England , English Culture , Europe , Famous Place , Global Communications , Greater London , Illuminated , Inner London , International Landmark , London – England , National Landmark , Night , Northern Europe , Old-fashioned , Pay Phone , Piccadilly Circus , Red , Retro Styled , Southeast England , Street , Telephone , Telephone Booth , Trafalgar Square , Travel , Travel Destinations , Urban Scene , Victorian Architecture , Victorian Style , Western Europe , city , cityscape , color image , local landmark , outdoors , tourism , travel locations , uk

A typical NYC high school student

A typical NYC high school student

This was taken on 89th Street Street and Lexington Avenue…

Assuming that this is a typical NYC high-school student (which I think is the case, simply from the experience of seeing lots of other young men and women of approximately similar age, looks, and clothing style out on the street at approximately the same time in mid-afternoon one day), how would we know that it’s someone from NYC, and how would we know this is what people (at least some people, if not all people) look like in 2014, as opposed to 2004 or 1994 or … well, 1964?

As for the NYC part: I don’t think there’s anything you could point to. Presumably the photo was taken somewhere in cold weather … but it could arguably have been in Santiago, Chile during their winter …

As for the date … hmmm, since I’m basically clueless about fashion styles, I’m a little cautious about this. I think the girl’s boots are probably a rough indicator of the current era, and her gray tights/pants might also be an indicator.

From my vague memory of huge, puffy, winter parkas that I wore as a young man, I would guess that her blue parka is fairly recent … but for all I know, jackets like that have been available for 10 years.

The only thing that I think we would all agree is relatively new is her cellphone. If you magnify the image (as I’ve done), you’ll see an Apple logo beneath the greenish protective cover. So it’s an iPhone, which means it isn’t any older than 2007.

Beyond that, I’m not really sure of anything…

Note: I chose this as my "photo of the day" for May 8, 2014.

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Posted by Ed Yourdon on 2014-05-08 11:00:44

Tagged: , New York , everyblock , boots , tights , parka , ski parka , redhead , cellphone , Upper East Side , scarf , crossed legs , Manhattan , iPhone , talking , Streets of New York

Razor Wire…chapter four The Firehydrant

Razor Wire...chapter four The Firehydrant

And special it was. Corporal Knapp was the leader of this rag tag bunch of labourers. Our gang was about one hundred and fifty strong. We were the first to leave the inner courtyard after all meals, it was important to the Corporal that we marched at a quick military like pace to the quarry and lowlands located at the rear of the couple of hundred acre property. Knapp was a character right out of a Peter O’Toole film, a real Lawrence of Arabia type, he wore britches some of the time, carried a mahogany cane with a brass head, had a dashing blondish moustache and spoke in a strong forceful voice, shouting was more like it as he had to be heard by a lot of people. His sidekick was a lieutenant, a quiet shorter gentlemen also in his fifties, for deputies the two of them appointed various characters of muscular ability to control the crowds, for rewards the deputies were given extra tea, biscuits and lots of lounging time. The gang marched out to the ‘Hill’ and would split up into groups. One group would grab a shovel and another group would grab wheelbarrows. In the low lying area those with shovels would load the barrow pushers with fresh cut loam and soil that would then be pushed up this fifty foot tall hill that had been constructed from nothing by the S.W.P.. One day I asked the Corporal why we were building this ‘Hill’, he responded humourously, “Gregory, it’s my job to know why we are doing this, it’s your job to do it, understand!”

There was a mid-morning tea break where we’d all sit down, on the ground somewhat exhausted as we kept a good pace, sit in the tall grass, watch the clouds roll by, re-energize, this was therapy have a cup of tea. Around this time I came up with the expression, “Cone flakes somethin Paddie?” I’d say this to some of my buddies, this guy who’s name was Shick, I’d call him Gilette, and another Garth Hudson lookalike, another junkie from Stratford, Ontario, that expression is still around, “Cone flakes something Paddie?”

Mike Everest was the gang leader, the head deputy, his buddy Jingles was the assistant leader, they were both motorcycle gang members, I’m not sure, either Choice or Vags, they were fair, kept you motivated so that Knapp and the Lieutenant could take it easy. Knapp was always shouting out orders, loved to be heard, I don’t know how many times he started the morning rant with his recollections of surviving the uprising at the prison in 1952, he’d say in his loud voice, “I survived one uprising and no one fucked me up the ass that time if I have to survive another one you turkeys won’t know what hit you.” Oh he was a larger than life character.

We’d all march in at lunchtime, have a hot meal, of soup, a sandwich, tea, loads of white bread, then take a long break out in the courtyard again, smoking as many smokes as one could afford to smoke, yakking with other friends on other gangs, getting some rays. Everyone pretty much stayed out of each others hair. Then we would line up again, get counted again, march back for more lugging, shoveling and wheel barrowing until about 4 O’clock then line up and, get counted again then march back to the courtyard. The constant coming and going became a clock. Though the work shifts could be brutal we knew they would not last long, they would be interrupted by a meal, a tea break, a march back to the courtyard.

When we arrived back at the courtyard everyone lined up again in their work groups, to be counted again, for the umpteenth time that day, they counted every prisoner about ten or more times a day, making sure there were no escapees. The odd time someone was missing or the count was off, life came to a standstill until the missing individual was accounted for. There was an hour or so of down time in the dorm before dinner was served, during this period you could pretty much take a nap if you liked, or play cards or checkers, or write letters, or read. The prison library was a well equipped space where calm bright types spent their time stocking the shelves and delivering books in mobile carts to inmates confined to the hospital, solitary confinement and other areas.

Showering would have been a pleasure but this was not allowed until later in the evening after ‘yardup’ regardless of your stench. As a genuine hunger set in I would anticipate the evening meals which were for the most part satisfactory, except the nights they served meatloaf, I never ate this or macaroni and cheese so I missed two meals a week. When those meals were served I’d eat some bread or a bag of chips from my locker. When roast beef was served each inmate was give a single approximately four inch square piece of beef sliced very thin, I recall watching some inmates asking if I was going to eat the grizzle I had cut off and left on my plate, they asked for it. For breakfast the prison served a thick sliced ‘farmers’ style bacon, a real artery clogging style of bacon, other guys didn’t like it as much so I’d ask them to get it for me, often I’d be eating ten slices with a pile of eggs or pancakes and toast and this thin red spread they called jam. On Sundays there was always a quarter chicken dinner served at lunch time, again some of the guys didn’t like their wings and I got a big pile of them on my plate, one time we counted twenty six wings, I’d pay a TM for each wing, since I was rich, a jailhouse millionaire, paying for things was easy. Those same Sundays they’d give us one of those vanilla ice creams, the ones that came in a thin paper wrapper, it was served in a bowl with a cookie, just like moms’ home cookin.

Saturdays and Sundays were days off for most of the population, days to rest up, to relax and there were differing ways of doing this. After breakfast on weekends there was ‘free time’ when the inmate could read, play cards, go down to the gym or sports fields where hundreds of other bored individuals were playing baseball, throwing footballs around, lifting weights, or just hanging around in groups. Some were walking around the fenced in perimeter of the five acre or so fields hoping to find a stash of drugs that might have been thrown over the wire chain link fences the night before and missed by the guards ‘sweeping’ the area prior to the inmates coming out. The razor wire at the top of the perimeter fence was a deterrent to any escape ideas. Remember, this was not a federal penitentiary, there were no gun towers. I did not once see any presence of arms, though I am sure there was a room full of weapons in case they were required.

Playing Rummy 500 was how I became a millionaire. Many guys wanted to beat me at this game. They never figured out my old move of laying a ‘live’ card down into the pile, then pick the pile up later and lay down a run of three of a kind or three in a row, then I would lay down another ‘live’ card which enabled me to pick up again a few turns later. A ‘live’ card was one that was in my hand and that was part of a set of three. The number of players in each game varied, two or three sometimes even four, I’d easily defeat them all. We gambled for canteen paybacks. Each inmate is given a sum for the work they do according to their classification. By serving more time combined with good behaviour you graduated to a different classification, I think we started out getting about $1.60 a week which was risen after three months of good behaviour to $2.00 and was capped at the highest classification at about $3.50, the motivational factor, some money for good behaviour and attendance seemed to work well.

With the funds each inmate was allowed to go to the canteen on a specified night where your account was on file, you gave the inmate attendant your inmate number, mine was #113625. The canteen had a variety of goods for sale, at non taxed rates, I think a pack of smokes cost between fifty cents and a dollar, there were a half dozen of the most popular brands to chose from, both filtered and non filtered, I was right into the Rothmans king size filters at the time. Besides tobacco they sold, gum, toiletries, chocolate bars, stamps, envelopes and small bags of potato chips for a dime a bag, these chips were my dinners on the nights mac and cheese or meatloaf was served. Pipes and pipe tobacco as well as Drum rolling tobacco was also available and by rolling your own you avoided the moochers who would hone in on your tailor mades if you weren’t careful. Some guys ended up owing me ten and twenty dollars for the rummy matches and I had about fifteen challengers who I put on the easy payment plan, setting up an account for each of them, easy payments of a dollar or two a week for fifteen weeks by ten or more people, I’d order pipes, rolling tobacco, bags of chips, candies, stamps, loads of tailor mades. I was still pretty new to the jail one had to fit in, learn their place so to speak.

The ring on my right hand had to go. A guard spotted it one day early in my sentence while I was going to the cafeteria. It wasn’t long before a friendly lieutenant stopped me in a hallway and took a look at the jewelry. He made an appointment for me to attend an office in the ‘trades wing’ of the prison. It didn’t take long for another inmate to gently saw the underside of the piece and it slid off. The ring was then placed in my possessions bag along with the rest of my things. On release I gave the ring to my brother Shane who treasured it.

There wasn’t anything left at my place in Toronto. I found this out when Boomer came to visit with Jack B. not very long into the sentence. “That brother of yours, Alex, he came and cleared out all your stuff, there was nothing there when we went over to the room on Walmer Road. That beautiful wooden statue you had paid a hundred dollars for, he gave it to one of the Vags up in the Junction for some speed.” Boomer slipped me a chunk of hash, good stuff, I remember putting it into my mouth as the visit ended, I was nervous about bringing it in and Boomer was nervous about laying it on me as the person who passed on such things was in serious trouble if there was a problem. There was however thankfully no problem. Jack to his credit left an interesting book titled ‘I Jan Kramer’ about this Dutch dude who liked to party smoke the gange and chase women.

The few visits I had from outsiders, they were difficult. I think in the future if I was doing a ‘bit’ I might pull the old Monk routine and ask folk to stay away. After each visit an immense feeling of loneliness and helplessness set in from nowhere. It knocked me over this emotion, this sadness at not being able to walk out those doors with your friends. Yet society imposes on folk the need for them to visit prisoners, as if you are in a hospital ward. Everyone is different and some inmates lived for those visits. Writing was a good tool for communication, you could control the pitch and slant of your words, convey what needed saying without to much mush, you could through words more easily turn off or perhaps better said, control the emotional buttons.

That chunk of hash was a popular item in there. In life I never needed much smoke to get off so after the long layoff the high was very intense for me, it was like starting over. The piece was a quarter ounce of nice Afghani black I had lots to share as I had resolved not to smoke much, it just wasn’t the same anymore. Robbie Cinnor my buddy from reception would invite me up to the school where he was one of the secretaries and we’d do a few tokes and put some tunes on the old eight track machine, I recall Bowie’s tune Space Oddity leaving a lasting impression on me, the song that went, ‘ground control to major Tom’ then we’d head out to the playing fields, somewhat mellower and watch the jocks kill themselves.

One night I was in a rare athletic mood and they were having a ‘Sports Challenge’, you had to watch who you were challenging cause some types of inmates were very proud of their abilities and didn’t take kindly to defeat. I picked an easy activity to participate in, the softball throw. Up to this point I hadn’t really let it out of the bag that I had been a pretty good athlete just a few years back, participating in the big three, hockey, football and baseball. When everyone else had finished their throws I went up to the area where the balls were, where the judges were, there were other aggressive inmates. I signed on, something like the draft beer challenge at U of W a few years earlier, I got a hold of a ball and I threw it further than anyone else, yards and yards further. Just walked away, sort of smiled at the biker jocks and rejoined Robbie for another blast of hash. You could discreetly toke in the fields, you didn’t want to be too obvious or the whole yard would be hanging around, naturally, bugging you for a puff or a small chunk. Besides everyone knew you had a visit and the chances were they laid something on you, there were no secrets in there. Hash was like gold in the joint, a smart trader could get anything for a half a gram, smokes, food from the kitchen, sex, if that was your thing, anything.

Robbie had an interesting life up to that unfortunate experience, being in there that is. He was the leader of a rock and roll band, of some significance. His group had cut a few records, and ended up playing on the U.S club circuit. They must have had something half decent going, coming from his home town of Sarnia which was just across a little bridge to somewhere in Michigan it was easy to see how the States was just another neighborhood to him, the way Hamilton and Barrie are to Torontonians. His band caught on well in Tucson Arizona right close to the Mexican border, and you know what the Mexicans are famous for, that’s right you guessed it…Marijuana. To supplement their musical income Robbie and his partner a nice fellow named Mike (who was also in the O.R. at the same time) started smuggling large quantities of pot over the porous border into America. Apparently it was quite simple, grease a few palms at the customs entry point and you sailed right in with truck loads of gange.

They got real big in Tucson what started out as ten pound runs turned into hundred pound loads. They bought a nightclub, brought in big rock bands to play, it was all a front for their smuggling business. In order to stay in business they had to pay off Joe Bananas the local mob boss or he was going to help them disappear. I loved Robbie’s fast lane stories, he was just a turned twenty something kid who had made it big, lived like a king and enjoyed telling me about it. His story improved, he got busted down there at a border crossing near Tucson bringing in a load of pot. Him and Mike they got thrown in the slammer, made bail just like on TV by using a bondsman to get out, had to give the guy an arm and a leg to arrange it because they were Canadians. Come court time they had a meeting before the trial, with the judge, in the judges quarters, lawyers present, Robbie, his partner Mike, the judge, the lawyers, it was agreed to give the judge ten large, that’s ten grand for you people not up on street jargon, and the charges were dismissed, on a technicality.

Robbie kept at the game, he figured he could substantially increase his profits if he brought the dope into Canada where it sold for quite a bit more. After getting popped in Arizona they folded that shop and moved home where they began working from Ann Arbour just a hundred miles or so across the border in Michigan. Ann Arbour was a big player in those days as many hip folk liked living and operating near this American dream town where the students ruled and the lax laws on pot consumption made for a friendly environment. John Sinclair a famous American Pot Martyr was constantly in the world news spreading the word attracting celebs like Ono and Lennon to his mary jane causes, ‘Free John Sinclair” was a popular phrase of the day, almost as popular as ‘No More War’ which turned on students were using as a mantra all over the States in opposition to American involvement in Vietnam and the random slaughter of Vietnamese people.

Robbie fit in well with this enclave of student unrest and he had no problem organizing truck loads of pot to cross the bridge at Sarnia supposedly loaded with his bands musical equipment. It worked for quite some time. I suppose the fact Robbies dad had something to do with Customs Canada helped. His dad couldn’t help him that day in the speed boat though when Robbie and his partner got caught on the Detroit River unloading a few hundred pounds of pot on to the Canadian side. They both got small time, two years less a day. They paid lawyers many thousands of dollars to get the light sentences, the family names were left in shambles. His dad had nothing to do with the game, Robbie he was some guy.

After a healthy month or so on the S.W.P. I got the notion to teach some kids basic reading and writing skills, one kid in particular Danny attached himself to me much like a younger brother, he was of Italian decent. I don’t know where his home town was, maybe London or Kitchener. You met these guys on your floor as they were in the same dorm, poor kid, could hardly write or read, he was very likable, his background was an endless rap on juvenile delinquency homes, a fatherless home life to which I was empathetic. I talked my way into the school principals office for an interview. Mr. Ewing was the principals name. If he had a first name I never knew it, as a creature Mr. Ewing reminded me of a Great Horned Owl as his demeanor was similar, we got along right from the start. He called my plan a terrific idea, sort of an ‘experimental school’. All I had to do to get it going was to find a couple of more pupils from the inmate population. This wasn’t that difficult as there were some other kids on the S.W.P. who needed some upgrading. I approached this pale faced dark haired French Canadian kid called Roger a pea souper from the Ottawa area and his cousin Albert a pimply faced 16 year old also from Ottawa. They were both smallish but made up for their lack of size by carrying themselves in the mould of the classic bad guy, like mini-French accented Jimmy Cagneys. The fix was now in, the two French kids went for interviews at the school and Mr. Ewing sent out slips the following week for the four of us to attend the school at 1PM on a Thursday afternoon, a great day.

The lieutenant of the SWP crew took me aside, shook my hand, told me not to fuck up in so many words and told me about the new work situation being approved by himself and Knapp. In the future I would teach these rascals in the afternoons and go to the S.W.P. in the mornings.

Mr. Dresser was the actual teacher in the school which had three classrooms, only one of which was ever used during my tenure. Mr. Dresser wore a blue checked sports jacket that contrasted well with his thin build and short cropped blonde hair. His body language told me he thought Ewing was making a mistake in giving me this opportunity. When I went to his class to borrow an unused globe and mock up of the planets and some notebooks and writing materials Dresser was uneasy, I could tell uneasiness in a person. My charges appeared on time, were for the first week or so eager to learn. I had them write and print the alphabet to get an understanding of their abilities and also had each pupil do some reading for me. Their abilities to read were quite poor, their writing skills very weak, I was surprised at the students lack of these basic skills, skills I thought everyone had, this was distressing and it made teaching difficult.

When the kids started to mess up in class, to show lack of interest, it didn’t surprise me, I didn’t have any authority over them and was not comfortable pretending that this was working, the one lad from London was still interested but Roger and his cousin kept skipping classes and this was the demise of the experiment after less than a month. Like I always say though, “good comes from bad” and this was no exception as the two fellows who worked at the school as secretaries, Steve Jeorger and Robbie Cinnors were being transferred to the Brampton facility for upgrading classes. Mr Ewing suggested I put in for one of the positions with the Work Program, I did and I guess Ewing had the fix in as I was working the desk at the school within days, being trained by Jeorger and Cinnors for the simple duties they held.

This was considered a plum position within the prison population, secretary of the school. There were many reasons for this. One excellent benefit was that you had a set of keys to get into the second floor school area at almost anytime up until last count. The school had audio equipment in the form of an eight track player as well as a TV set connected to the exterior antenna and a radio that received both AM and FM frequencies. It was a great place to escape to in the evenings, to have a toke if you were so fortunate and to chill out, get away from the madness of the dorm and the inherent repetitiveness that went with the dorm life. I never once saw a guard up in the school area. Besides having daytime classes the schools various rooms were also used in the evenings for meetings by organizations in place to assist those who wanted help with anger or drugs counseling as well as counsel for those who drank excessively and some with problems with relationships who had been ordered by a judge to receive help while incarcerated.

Folk would come in from the street and work with inmates, my job was to see that the inmate got to the classroom and this was done simply by issuing them a pass slip for that event by typing it up during the day. The slip was delivered to the inmates dorm or cell, they received the pass when they came in from whichever work detail they were on, it was an efficient system although breakdowns did occur. The laymen and women who came in to the prison established close relationships with the inmates. After some time it wasn’t unusual for them to be asked to bring in items for prisoners, things like pills to weed. Private mail was sent out this way as all other mail supposedly was read by the staff before being sent to the addressee. I still haven’t forgotten the rules concerning mail, it remains a very poignant memory. At that time inmates were allowed a letter a week which had to be written on prison issue paper. This paper came in the form of a standard size white page lined in almost half inch increments, the letter had to written in pencil. From time to time I have received letters from prisoners and the instant I see the pencil written pages I am reminded of my own incarceration.

I caught on quick to the typing assignment which was the main function of the secretary as well as answering the telephone for Mr Ewing who’s office was situated next door, the door between his office and my area was open so he could easily ask for some assistance. When Mr. Ewing requested a task he did so in the most polite fashion instilling in his aides a feeling of worth and usefulness. He was an old codger Ewing was, had an owl like energy and look, quiet but efficient, and his style of management was quite effective considering the misfits he encountered. After only a few months in this jail I had made a huge jump in my status and there was a degree of confidence that came with this accomplishment, it mattered not to me that I was in jail and climbing the ladder, it was a ladder, like the praise the dead junkie in Windsor had given me for the Gypsy Caravan writing.

Posted by selrahcyrogerg on 2013-12-04 13:13:16

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Empire State – New York City

Empire State -  New York City

The Empire State Building is a 102-story skyscraper located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, on Fifth Avenue between West 33rd and 34th Streets. It has a roof height of 1,250 feet (380 m), and with its antenna spire included, it stands a total of 1,454 feet (443 m) high. Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, the Empire State. It stood as the world’s tallest building for nearly 40 years, from its completion in early 1931 until the topping out of the original World Trade Center’s North Tower in late 1970. Following the September 11 attacks in 2001, the Empire State Building was again the tallest building in New York (although it was no longer the tallest in the US or the world), until One World Trade Center reached a greater height on April 30, 2012. The Empire State Building is currently the fourth-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States (after the One World Trade Center, the Willis Tower and Trump International Hotel and Tower, both in Chicago), and the 25th-tallest in the world (the tallest now is Burj Khalifa, located in Dubai). It is also the fifth-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

The Empire State Building is generally thought of as an American cultural icon. It is designed in the distinctive Art Deco style and has been named as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The building and its street floor interior are designated landmarks of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, and confirmed by the New York City Board of Estimate. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1986. In 2007, it was ranked number one on the AIA’s List of America’s Favorite Architecture.

The building is owned by the Empire State Realty Trust, of which Anthony Malkin serves as Chairman, CEO and President.[17] In 2010, the Empire State Building underwent a $550 million renovation, with $120 million spent to transform the building into a more energy efficient and eco-friendly structure.[18] The Empire State Building is the tallest Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified building in the United States, having received a gold LEED rating in September 2011.

History
The site of the Empire State Building was first developed as the John Thompson Farm in the late 18th century. At the time, a stream ran across the site, emptying into Sunfish Pond, located a block away. Beginning in the late 19th century, the block was occupied by the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, frequented by The Four Hundred, the social elite of New York.

The limestone for the Empire State Building came from the Empire Mill in Sanders, Indiana which is an unincorporated town adjacent to Bloomington, Indiana. The Empire Mill Land office is near State Road 37 and Old State Road 37 just south of Bloomington. Bloomington, Bedford and Oolitic area are known locally as the limestone capital of the world

Design and construction:
The Empire State Building was designed by William F. Lamb from the architectural firm Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, which produced the building drawings in just two weeks, using its earlier designs for the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the Carew Tower in Cincinnati, Ohio (designed by the architectural firm W. W. Ahlschlager & Associates) as a basis. Every year the staff of the Empire State Building sends a Father’s Day card to the staff at the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem to pay homage to its role as predecessor to the Empire State Building. The building was designed from the top down. The general contractors were The Starrett Brothers and Eken, and the project was financed primarily by John J. Raskob and Pierre S. du Pont. The construction company was chaired by Alfred E. Smith, a former Governor of New York and James Farley’s General Builders Supply Corporation supplied the building materials. John W. Bowser was project construction superintendent.

Excavation of the site began on January 22, 1930, and construction on the building itself started symbolically on March 17—St. Patrick’s Day—per Al Smith’s influence as Empire State, Inc. president. The project involved 3,400 workers, mostly immigrants from Europe, along with hundreds of Mohawk iron workers, many from the Kahnawake reserve near Montreal. According to official accounts, five workers died during the construction. Governor Smith’s grandchildren cut the ribbon on May 1, 1931. Lewis Wickes Hine’s photography of the construction provides not only invaluable documentation of the construction, but also a glimpse into common day life of workers in that era.

The construction was part of an intense competition in New York for the title of "world’s tallest building". Two other projects fighting for the title, 40 Wall Street and the Chrysler Building, were still under construction when work began on the Empire State Building. Each held the title for less than a year, as the Empire State Building surpassed them upon its completion, just 410 days after construction commenced. Instead of taking 18 months as anticipated, the construction took just under fifteen. The building was officially opened on May 1, 1931 in dramatic fashion, when United States President Herbert Hoover turned on the building’s lights with the push of a button from Washington, D.C. Coincidentally, the first use of tower lights atop the Empire State Building, the following year, was for the purpose of signaling the victory of Franklin D. Roosevelt over Hoover in the presidential election of November 1932.

Opening
The building’s opening coincided with the Great Depression in the United States, and as a result much of its office space was initially unrented. The building’s vacancy was exacerbated by its poor location on 34th Street, which placed it relatively far from public transportation, as Grand Central Terminal and Penn Station, built decades beforehand, are several blocks away, as is the more recently built Port Authority Bus Terminal. Other more successful skyscrapers, such as the Chrysler Building, did not have this problem. In its first year of operation, the observation deck took in approximately 2 million dollars, as much money as its owners made in rent that year. The lack of renters led New Yorkers to deride the building as the "Empty State Building". The building would not become profitable until 1950. The famous 1951 sale of the Empire State Building to Roger L. Stevens and his business partners was brokered by the prominent upper Manhattan real-estate firm Charles F. Noyes & Company for a record $51 million. At the time, that was the highest price paid for a single structure in real-estate history.

Features
Above the 102nd floor

On the 102nd floor of the Empire State Building there is a door with stairs ascending up, which leads into the 103rd floor. This was originally built as a disembarkation floor for airships tethered to the building’s spire, and features a circular balcony outside the room as well. It is now a hot spot for when celebrities visit, and an access point to reach the spire for maintenance purposes. The room currently contains electrical equipment, though this was edited out, by camera angle, during the "In the Wind" season-four finale of White Collar. Above the 103rd floor, there is a set of stairs and a ladder to reach the spire for maintenance work only. The building’s distinctive Art Deco spire was originally designed to be a mooring mast and depot for dirigibles. The 103rd floor was originally a landing platform with a dirigible gangplank. A particular elevator, traveling between the 86th and 102nd floors, was supposed to transport passengers after they checked in at the observation deck on the 86th floor. However, the idea proved to be impractical and dangerous after a few attempts with airships, due to the powerful updrafts caused by the size of the building itself, as well as the lack of mooring lines tying the other end of the craft to the ground. A large broadcast tower was added to the top of the spire in the early 1950s, in order to support the transmission antennas of several television and FM stations. Up to that point, NBC had the exclusive rights to the site, and – beginning in 1931 – built various, smaller antenna structures dedicated to their television transmissions.

Broadcast stations

New York City is the largest media market in the United States. Since the September 11 attacks, nearly all of the city’s commercial broadcast stations (both television and FM radio) have transmitted from the top of the Empire State Building, although a few FM stations are located at the nearby Condé Nast Building. Most New York City AM stations broadcast from sites across the Hudson River in New Jersey or from other surrounding areas.

Observation decks

The Empire State Building has one of the most popular outdoor observatories in the world, having been visited by over 110 million people. The 86th-floor observation deck offers impressive 360-degree views of the city. There is a second observation deck on the 102nd floor that is open to the public. It was closed in 1999, but reopened in November 2005. It is completely enclosed and much smaller than the first one; it may be closed on high-traffic days. Tourists may pay to visit the observation deck on the 86th floor and an additional amount for the 102nd floor. The lines to enter the observation decks, according to Concierge.com, are "as legendary as the building itself:" there are five of them: the sidewalk line, the lobby elevator line, the ticket purchase line, the second elevator line, and the line to get off the elevator and onto the observation deck. For an extra fee tourists can skip to the front of the line. The Empire State Building makes more money from tickets sales for its observation decks than it does from renting office space.

Height records and comparisons :
The Empire State Building remained the tallest man-made structure in the world for 23 years before it was surpassed by the Griffin Television Tower Oklahoma (KWTV Mast) in 1954. It was also the tallest free-standing structure in the world for 36 years before it was surpassed by the Ostankino Tower in 1967.

The longest world record held by the Empire State Building was for the tallest skyscraper (to structural height), which it held for 42 years until it was surpassed by the North Tower of the World Trade Center in 1972. An early-1970s proposal to dismantle the spire and replace it with an additional 11 floors, which would have brought the building’s height to 1,494 feet (455 m) and made it once again the world’s tallest at the time, was considered but ultimately rejected.

With the destruction of the World Trade Center in the September 11 attacks, the Empire State Building again became the tallest building in New York City, and the second-tallest building in the Americas, surpassed only by the Willis Tower in Chicago. It is currently the fifth-tallest, surpassed by the Willis Tower, the Trump International Hotel and Tower (Chicago), 432 Park Avenue and the new One World Trade Center. One World Trade Center surpassed the roof height of the Empire State Building on April 30, 2012, and became the tallest building in New York City—on the way toward becoming the tallest building in the Americas at a planned 1,776 feet (541 m).

When measured by pinnacle height, the Empire State Building is the fourth-tallest building in the USA, surpassed by One World Trade Center, Willis Tower and Chicago’s John Hancock Center. On clear days, the building can be seen from much of the New York Metropolitan Area, and as far away as New Haven, Connecticut and Morristown, New Jersey.

Neighboring Midtown Manhattan landmarks
The Empire State Building anchors an area of Midtown which features other major Manhattan landmarks as well, including Macy’s Herald Square, Koreatown,[80] Penn Station, Madison Square Garden, and the Flower District. Together, these sites contribute to a significant volume of commuter and tourist pedestrian traffic traversing the southern portion of Midtown Manhattan.

Posted by Arch_Sam on 2015-05-04 08:54:33

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